Health Care Law Today

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We have posted previously in Healthcare Law Today related to physician private equity transactions, commonly called “recapitalizations.” Most of the discussions have been about the “who,” the “why” and the “how” of these transactions.  What we haven’t yet discussed are the issues that may arise following the closing of one of these transactions.  While the impact of the issues generally emerge post-closing, many can be addressed, or at least recognized, at the time the…
CMS just announced a clarification that remote patient monitoring under CPT code 99457 may be furnished by auxiliary personnel, “incident to” the billing practitioner’s professional services.  An “incident to” service is one that is performed under the supervision of a physician (broadly defined), and billed to Medicare in the name of the physician, subject to certain requirements, one of which is discussed below.  The announcement came in a technical correction issued March 14, 2019 and…
Website accessibility under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Rehabilitation Act) is an issue of which health care providers and other health care companies should be aware. There have been lawsuits filed that include claims for website accessibility under these Acts. A number of entities, including health care providers, have received complaints on behalf of visually impaired individuals claiming that the entity’s web presence is not equally accessible…
In response to the opioid crisis, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is cracking down on pharmacies, pharmacists, and prescribers by leveraging an old enforcement weapon: revocation of controlled substance registrations. The DEA actively revived this enforcement mechanism in February and March of 2018 when it arrested 29 people and revoked 147 controlled substance registrations throughout the country.1 Revocations carry the harsh consequence of preventing pharmacies, pharmacists, and prescribers from dispensing or prescribing federally controlled substances,…
On February 27, 2019, CMS will hold its first webinar to provide an overview on its new Emergency Triage, Treat, and Transport (ET3) Model for suppliers of emergency medicine services (EMS) and ambulance suppliers. On February 14, 2019, CMS’ Innovation Center announced ET3’s upcoming availability, which emphasizes the need for EMS suppliers to partner with other health care providers in order to triage and treat patients more effectively. For the first time, the Medicare program…
Co-Author: Nina Zhang, Stephenson Acquisto & Colman This article addresses the high-level challenges of tackling drug pricing policy related to prices that seniors and government programs pay, as well as the potential effects that the Trump administration’s policy efforts could have on those prices.1 Starting in January 2019, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will provide Medicare Advantage plans—private health insurance plans that provide Medicare benefits to 20 million Medicare beneficiaries (a third…
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently proposed two new rules designed to increase patient and provider access to health records. As stated by HHS in its press release, the proposed rules “will support seamless and secure access, exchange, and use of electronic health information.” These proposed rules stem from two separate components within HHS – the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health…
In November 2018, I had the honor and pleasure of speaking at the AHLA Fundamentals of Health Law program in Chicago. This is a conference that is designed for attorneys (and others) who are relatively new to health law. I spoke on the exciting topic of “Medicare Parts A and B.” As I prepared for this session, the first thought I had was that it was too hard a topic, even though I have been…
Virginia lawmakers have taken new steps to expand the use of remote patient monitoring among the State’s residents, with both the House and Senate unanimously passing bipartisan legislation ensuring that commercial health plans will cover remote patient monitoring services. The bill now heads to the office of Governor Ralph Northam for signature.…