Internet Newsletter for Lawyers

Latest from Internet Newsletter for Lawyers - Page 3

On 3 March 2020 the Lord Chancellor, Robert Buckland QC, made a written ministerial statement welcoming the report of the Law Commission on Electronic Execution of Documents (Law Com No 386). That report concludes that there is no need for formal primary legislation to reinforce the legal validity of electronic signatures on documents, and that the existing framework makes clear that businesses and individuals can feel confident in using e-signatures in commercial transactions. This is…
Advice from the MD of Inpractice UK on coping with the current crisis, with insights from several other PMS suppliers. The impact of Covid-19 is being felt by all of us to varying degrees. People should work from home if they can but that may not be possible yet for everyone in your practice. As many of you will be doing this already, there is advice here to help refine that experience. Also, on the…
The government recently indicated a willingness to diverge from EU regulations post-Brexit. Perhaps one of the more significant moves in this direction is the announcement by Universities and Science Minister Chris Skidmore that the UK will not implement the controversial EU Copyright Directive. The main criticism levelled at the directive was down to Article 17* Use of protected content by online content-sharing service providers. Essentially this makes services such as YouTube and Facebook responsible…
It was recently reported that the European Commission (EC) was considering a temporary ban on the use of facial recognition technology in public places. A draft white paper on artificial intelligence had reportedly stated that the “use of facial recognition technology by private or public actors in public spaces would be prohibited for a definite period (eg three to five years) during which a sound methodology for assessing the impacts of this technology and possible…
To launch a new edition of a legal textbook in the very month that the UK is about to leave the EU – let alone a book focused on the internet at the height of the techlash – may seem a little reckless. Or perhaps not. Internet law stays still for hardly a moment anyway. The couple of months since the 5th edition of Internet Law and Regulation went to press have already seen two…
To launch a new edition of a legal textbook in the very month that the UK is about to leave the EU – let alone a book focused on the internet at the height of the techlash – may seem a little reckless. Or perhaps not. Internet law stays still for hardly a moment anyway. The couple of months since the 5th edition of Internet Law and Regulation went to press have already seen two…
Public Information Online (PIO) at publicinformationonline.com is an online database provided by Dandy Booksellers, who are well established suppliers of official government print publications. The PIO database collects and provides access to digitised parliamentary papers going back for more than a century. The material held includes Public General Acts since 1900, House of Lords Papers from 1901, Hansard debates from 1909, House of Commons Bills from 1919, Public Bill and General Committee Debates from 1919,…
Public Information Online (PIO) at publicinformationonline.com is an online database provided by Dandy Booksellers, who are well established suppliers of official government print publications. The PIO database collects and provides access to digitised parliamentary papers going back for more than a century. The material held includes Public General Acts since 1900, House of Lords Papers from 1901, Hansard debates from 1909, House of Commons Bills from 1919, Public Bill and General Committee Debates from 1919,…
“I read it on the internet” has become a phrase which often generates mockery and epitomises gullibility or naivety about the online world. In the 1950s science fiction writer Theodore Sturgeon proclaimed that “ninety percent of everything is crud” which came to be known as Sturgeon’s Law. One can only speculate as to how Sturgeon may have adapted the percentage value of his law had he lived in the age of cat memes and…
“I read it on the internet” has become a phrase which often generates mockery and epitomises gullibility or naivety about the online world. In the 1950s science fiction writer Theodore Sturgeon proclaimed that “ninety percent of everything is crud” which came to be known as Sturgeon’s Law. One can only speculate as to how Sturgeon may have adapted the percentage value of his law had he lived in the age of cat memes and…