Recently a peer-reviewed study appeared in Environmental Health Perspectives that suggested a significant drop in levels of bisphenol A when the study participants consumed a diet that avoided contact with BPA.

This study reflects what a number of recent studies have already proven: BPA is rapidly excreted from the body and therefore reduces any risk of toxic effects.

While this study may have sparked attention and interest from a number of safety and health-conscious zealots, its findings are not new or even newsworthy. So why am I taking time out of my busy schedule to write about this study in particular?  It’s because it’s time to set the record straight on what this study says, and others like it, actually mean to the public based on facts, rather than the sensational “headlines” without the science to prove it.

This study is small in scope (sample size of 20 participants) and does not sufficiently represent the broad U.S. population nor does it account for a diet that is moderate in consumption and rich in variety.  It should not be viewed as the definitive study regarding BPA.  It is again, one of a number of small scale studies that show little to no direct cause and effect but are used to determine further research.

To date, there is no scientific evidence of any illness, disease or adverse health effect in people attributed to a food product that used BPA as a packaging compound.  Moreover, an individual would have to consume several hundreds of cans of foods per day to exceed tolerable daily levels as established by regulatory bodies across the globe who have affirmed its safe use including:

·         World Health Organization (WHO)

·         European Food Safety Authority (EFSA)

·         U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

BPA continues to be used as a safe and effective packaging component. Its use has actually increased the safety of our global food supply by keeping out harmful bacteria and microorganisms. Foods packaged utilizing the BPA technology provide safe, cost-effective opportunities for people to acquire adequate nutrition.  Given today’s economic uncertainties and food availability, it’s irresponsible to suggest every consumer only eat food with limited food packaging.

Here’s what you really need to know . . .

We all have very personal feelings about the food we eat and serve our families and loved ones.  I too understand how difficult it is to balance emerging science, sensational news and information and in this case food safety; however, it is important to understand the facts.  This study does not warrant a radical change in diet.  In this instance and always, the public is advised to maintain a healthful diet, rich in variety and consumed in moderation to maintain and sustain maximum healthfulness.

————————-

“Putting the BPA Study in Perspective” by Anthony Flood was first published March 31, 2011 in Food Insight Blog. 

View Original Source
Photo of International Food Information Council Foundation International Food Information Council Foundation

Incorporated as a public education foundation in 1991 and based in Washington, DC, the International Food Information Council Foundation, is independent and not-for-profit.  We do not lobby or further any political, partisan, or corporate interest.  We bring together, work with, and provide information to consumers, health and nutrition professionals, educators, government officials, and food, beverage, and agricultural industry professionals. We have established partnerships with a wide range of credible professional organizations, government agencies, and academic institutions to advance the public understanding of key issues. For example, we have a long-standing relationship with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion as part of the Dietary Guidelines Alliance, a public-private partnership focused on the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the MyPyramid Food Guidance System. Recognizing the global nature of food safety, nutrition, and health issues, the Foundation extends its mission internationally. We share education materials with an independent network of Food Information Organizations and partners from around the world. We also serve as a news media resource. We provide science-based information to the media and refer journalists to our 350 independent, credentialed experts on a variety of nutrition and food safety topics.