A Happy and Healthy New Year to everyone.
Its 2018, a new year and time for a change.
Since about 2000 I have been working on the concept of online legal services and “elawyering”.
Since about 2000 I have been working on the concept of online legal services and “elawyering”. Beginning in 2000, I co-chaired the American Bar Association’s eLawyering Task Force, with my colleague Marc Lauritsen, publishing articles about the eLawyering concept, publishing guidelines on the delivery of online legal services, guidelines for operating law practices in the cloud and creating the ABA’s James Keane Award for Excellence in eLawyering. These concepts have now mainstreamed in the legal profession, and the ABA’s Law Practice Division recently sunset the eLawyering Task Force.
These concepts have now mainstreamed in the legal profession, and the ABA’s Law Practice Division recently sunset the eLawyering Task Force.
So, I felt it was time to move in a new direction and “reboot.”
For many years I published a blog on eLawyering. I discontinued it, effective today, moved some of the most relevant content to this blog. I will writing about a broader range of subjects on the future of the legal profession and the delivery of legal services.

Since 2000, I have been the CEO of SmartLegalForms, Inc., one of the first document automation platforms for consumers, and also running its sister company, DirectLaw, Inc., a virtual law firm platform for solos and small law firms.
Running a company requires intense focus. To clear my mind for the future, I recently sold my interest in www.directlaw.com and www.smartlegalforms.co.
Both companies are now in the very capable hands of Gregor Weeks, previously the chief technology officer for both companies and now CEO, and the developer of the DirectLaw virtual law firm platform. I am still involved in both companies, but as an advisor and not involved in day-to-day operations.

One new focus is LawMediaLabs, Inc., an incubator and vehicle to invest in and develop early stage legal technology startups. I am interested in working with companies developing apps that reduce friction between consumers and access to the legal system. My career-long interest in A2J remains unabated.
Having developed one of the first PC-based litigation support software programs way back in 1983, (a money-loser – to early on the curve), I now see in the fullness of time what I predicted foolishly almost 40 years ago – the total transformation of the practice of law by information technology. AI and the Law, for example, is not just hype.
It will be very interesting to see the transformations that will occur in the next decade and hopefully I will be around to see these early predictions fully realized.

One new project I am involved in as a co-founder is an AI startup called Intraspexion. Nick Brestoff, is the CEO and moving force. Nick has invented a patented “deep learning” technology that enables corporations to avoid or reduce litigation. Rather than spend an average of $400,000 a case in legal fees, Intraspexion’s technology identifies risks before they explode into a full blown case. The technology gives general counsel a radar screen that points the way to investigation, nipping a conflict in the bud. I would love to make a dent in the legal fee spend of large corporations and shake-up the litigation departments of large law firms. This company is an early stage startup.
You can keep up with further developments on the Intraspexion project, and my other LawMediaLabs projects at this blog and follow me on Twitter.