In the 12 months from October 2018 through September 2019, the most recent period reported by OSHA,[1] the workplace safety agency cited the following standards[2]more than any other in the 28 states which do not have OSHA-approved state plans, including Colorado:

  1. 1926.501 – Duty to have fall protection – included in 459 citations, resulting in $2,475,596 in penalties ($5,393/citation);
  2. 1926.451 – General requirements for scaffolds – included in 265 citations, resulting in $834,324 in penalties ($3,148/citation);
  3. 1926.1053 – Requirements for ladders including job-made ladders – included in 164 citations, resulting in $354,853 in penalties ($2,163/citation);
  4. 1926.503 – Training requirements related to fall protection – included in 114 citations, resulting in $156,076 in penalties ($1,369/citation); 
  5. 1926.405 – Wiring methods, components, and equipment for general use – included in 93 citations, resulting in $150,821 in penalties ($1,621/citation);
  6. 1926.20 – General safety and health provisions – included in 85 citations, resulting in $328,491 in penalties ($3,864/citation);
  7. 1926.1052 – Requirements for stairways – included in 79 citations, resulting in $155,651 in penalties ($1,970/citation);
  8. 1926.102 – Requirements for eye and face protection – included in 67 citations, resulting in $165,595 in penalties ($2,471/citation);
  9. 1926.403 – General requirements for electrical conductors and equipment – included in 63 citations, resulting in $146,050 in penalties ($2,318/citation), and;
  10. 1926.100 – Requirements for head protection – included in 55 citations, resulting in $127,274 in penalties ($2,314/citation).

For those companies facing a slow-down in production related to the COVID-19 outbreak, it may be a good time to revamp safety programs.  A good place to start this process is the OSHA Compliance Assistance Quick Start webpage.