Employment & Labor

Hi, I’m Debbrah O’Rell with Tuckner Sipser, an employment discrimination law firm. And let me say at the start, I’m not a lawyer, I don’t give legal advice, but I do share information about the process in general. And the question I want to address today is, “If I complain about being discriminated against, I’m afraid I’m going to be fired. I can’t afford to be without my job. What do I do?” So first…
On April 7, 2020, the California Department of Industrial Relations’ Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) issued COVID-19 Safety and Health Guidance (in English and Spanish) for agricultural employers. The guidance is not a new legal obligation but rather a reminder that COVID-19 is a workplace hazard to be addressed by an Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP).…
On April 6, 2020, South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster issued Executive Order No. 2020-21 (E.O. 2020-21), which implemented a “home or work” mandate. The order directs South Carolina inhabitants to stay in their homes as of 5:00 p.m. on April 7, 2020, except for engaging in “Essential Business,” “Essential Activities,” or “Critical Infrastructure Operations.” The order also mandates that inhabitants practice social distancing and take every possible precaution to prevent the continued spread of COVID-19.…
Untangling the web of options presented to small employers under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) and Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act can seem daunting. A small employer (generally one with no more than 500 employees) has a number of options, as well as obligations, to consider when adjusting to challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic. In broad terms, the obligations and solutions presented under the FFCRA and the CARES Act…
Two California cities, San Francisco and San Jose adopted emergency ordinances to expand paid sick leave and emergency Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) leave benefits.  The ordinances cover gaps under federal law by expanding leave benefits under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) to employers with more than 500 employees. The ordinances cover most gig workers and independent contractors. Under the ordinances, all workers are presumed to be employees unless their employer can affirmatively…

Employment & Labor Blogs