This article originally appeared in Law360. Companies have had a lot to digest since the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “TJCA”) late last year.  But for executive compensation attorneys and professionals who work with or advise public companies, the elimination of the tax deduction for performance-based compensation under section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code was perhaps the most significant change brought about by tax reform.  View Full Post
She Refused To Wear High Heels At Work! Last year it was reported that members of the UK Parliament called for a review of the 2010 Equality Act when women “told two Commons’ committees how employers demanded they wear revealing clothes, dye their hair blonde and constantly reapply their make-up while at work.” This campaign began with a petition submitted by a woman “who was sent home by her employer … on her first day with them because she refused to wear heels.” Well, it turns out that the ordered Parliamentary inquiry has yielded its results – a new guidance on workplace dress code compliance for employers. View Full Post
California Attempts to Clarify Salary History Ban Legislation We are pleased to cross-post with our sister blog, Pay Equity Microblog, the following important and timely blog post regarding the latest in California pay equity legislation. Seyfarth Synopsis: California Governor Brown signed into law yesterday Assembly Bill No. 2282 to clarify previously passed legislation that prohibits inquiries into an applicant’s salary history. View Full Post
Location Information Is Protected by the 4th Amendment, SCOTUS Rules As close observers of the implications of privacy law on companies’ data collection, usage and disclosure practices, we at Socially Aware were among the many tech-law enthusiasts anticipating the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Carpenter v. United States, in which the Court held that the government must obtain a warrant to acquire customer location information maintained by cellular service providers, at least where that information covers a period of a week or more. View Full Post
As previously anticipated on this blog, the Department of Labor (DOL) has formally rescinded the so-called “Persuader Rule.” Under court injunction preventing enforcement since November 2016, the DOL on Wednesday announced that the controversial rule had been withdrawn. In a press release, Deputy Assistant Nathan Mehrens stated:  “By rescinding this Rule, the Department stands up for the rights of Americans to ask a question of their attorney without mandated disclosure to the government.” The Persuader Rule would have imposed greater reporting requirements on employers for communications involving union drives in the workplace. View Full Post