Back in 2015 Mark Nieds traded the cold and wind of Chicago for balmy Southwest Florida—but never stopped practicing IP law, or blogging. He helped build an intellectual property group at Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt and also started writing for the firm’s Southwest Florida Business and IP Blog. He joins Bob Ambrogi on This Week in Legal Blogging and provides a number of insights on his own writing technique as well as the current state of IP law in Southwest Florida.

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Episode Outline

  • 1:53 – How he ended up practicing IP law in Florida
  • 3:11 – What the firm and his practice group looks like
  • 4:39 – Business has been booming since the start of the pandemic
  • 6:14 – The origins of the Southwest Florida Business and IP Blog
  • 7:35 – How he and his colleagues share responsibilities for the blog
  • 9:26 – Nieds’ past experience has been with blogging and other forms of writing
  • 10:08 – His fundamental practices when blogging
  • 13:19 – What blogging has done for him and the response he gets to his posts
  • 17:41 – Crystallizing information and keeping posts concise
  • 18:35 – Which kinds of posts he gets the most engagement from
  • 21:25 – His advice to attorneys looking to start blogging: “content is king”
Photo of Alec Downing Alec Downing

Alec is an intern on LexBlog’s publishing team where he creates content for the company’s various digital platforms. A former radio news anchor, Alec brings both a background in journalism and a passion for law. Alec has the eventual goal of attending law…

Alec is an intern on LexBlog’s publishing team where he creates content for the company’s various digital platforms. A former radio news anchor, Alec brings both a background in journalism and a passion for law. Alec has the eventual goal of attending law school—and of course—starting his own law blog. His writing has been published in The Seattle Times and Crosscut.