In case you weren’t aware, November is National Blog Posting Month and the LexBlog community started things off with a bang by giving our publishing team more quality blog posts than they could possibly include in this post. Alec and Michelle have narrowed it down to a handful of their favorites, including pieces inspired by FOIA requests, mailbag pieces as well as some pandemic retrospectives.


Michelle’s picks

Q&A with EBG’s Managing Director, James P. Flynn: Lessons from a Virtual Bench Trial

Interview posts are always great—and if you’re not sure why check out our Resource Center piece on the topic. And if you’re still not convinced on why they’re all that, look no further than this blog post from Robert Travisano who interviews Managing Director James Flynn. Interview posts don’t always have to take place with someone outside your bubble—as this piece illustrates, they can be super insightful just speaking to members of your time. Flynn answers questions regarding his recent participation in a virtual bench trial. Rather than just write up a post on the matter himself, he’s interviewed to share his thoughts on the experience and the medium as a whole. I think it’s a really intriguing, creative format for a blog post. Available at Epstein Becker Green’s Commercial Litigation Update.

Bipartisan Federal Legislation Introduced to Drastically Modify NCAA’s Current Infractions Process

A key part of blogging is adding onto the conversation—not always starting it. What are others in the space saying—not just other bloggers, but journalists or reporters as well? Don’t be afraid to pull in those other thoughts, in fact, citing them is encouraged. Gregg Clifton‘s post on a new piece of NCAA legislation is a perfect example of this in action. Clifton, one of the top sports law bloggers in our community, provides important quotes from congressmen directly involved in the bill. This context drastically increase the quality of the blog post and Clifton seamlessly interweaves these quotes with his own personal insights and commentary. Available at Jackson Lewis’s Collegiate & Professional Sports Law Blog.

What lessons have you learned during the course of the pandemic—professionally or personally—that made you a better lawyer?

Right off the bat you can tell this is going to be a really interesting and insightful post just from the title. The Minnesota Bar Association offers four diverse perspectives when it comes to lessons learned during the pandemic. It’s a great read—not just for any budding or current lawyer—but for anyone in general. I’m by no means a legal professional but it was really engaging to hear these personal stories—which came from Emily Cooper, Anne Haaland, Susie Vang and Adam Johnson. Available at Bench & Bar of Minnesota.


Alec’s Picks

CAS Legal Mailbag Question of the Week – 11/4/2021

It isn’t my first time highlighting Thomas Mooney and one of his legal mailbag posts—it likely won’t be the last. Mooney’s long-running mailbag feature is proof that they are an incredibly effective way to create posts tailored to the interests of your readers. If you’re looking to start a mailbag you must stick with it for the long haul and build your reputation so that, like Mooney, readers consistently are bringing you interesting legal questions. He tackles one such legal question in this post which involves political expression in school—an area of law that always compels me. As per usual, Mooney provides insightful analysis and gives measured input on quite the sticky situation. A must read. Available at Shipman & Goodwin LLP’s School Law.

CFPB Enforcement Activity Increased in FY2021

As a former journalist I am no stranger to FOIA requests. I always found that waiting on a FOIA request to be returned was quite the lesson in patience, but they did often yield interesting information or data that made for great articles, or in this case, blog posts. Ori Lev uses information obtained via FOIA requests of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and dives into the numbers. Lev takes a look at the number of enforcement actions taken by the CFPB over the years, something he has blogged about in the past. It’s great to see it getting a fresh update with the 2021 fiscal year numbers. This is an illustrative example of how to incorporate data into your blog posts and provide useful observations based on it. Available at Mayer Brown’s Consumer Financial Services Review.

Where are law students learning about NewLaw? (274)

In this post Anusia Gillespie explains why she makes herself available to law students for informational interviews and how she handles them. As an advocate of NewLaw she sees these interviews as an opportunity to educate and engage with the next generation of lawyers on this topic. Drawing on the success she has had running these info sessions, she provides excellent advice to others who subscribe to the NewLaw approach on how to run these types of informational interviews. This post is packed with practical advice, for example Gillespie includes some of the questions about NewLaw she is often asked by law students during these interviews along with her responses. As someone who intends to attend law school in the not too distant future, I found this post very informative in a number of ways. Perhaps someday I will be one of the students attending Gillespie’s “NewLaw Office Hour.” Available at the Legal Evolution blog.

Photo of Michelle Newblom Michelle Newblom

Michelle works on LexBlog’s Publishing team and assists in managing and creating the company’s editorial and social content, as well as working with clients to ensure the overall success of their blogs. She has experience working in all different realms of publishing—including newspapers,

Michelle works on LexBlog’s Publishing team and assists in managing and creating the company’s editorial and social content, as well as working with clients to ensure the overall success of their blogs. She has experience working in all different realms of publishing—including newspapers, magazines and research journals. Michelle has published a poetry book and been featured in an anthology.

Photo of Alec Downing Alec Downing

Alec is an intern on LexBlog’s publishing team where he creates content for the company’s various digital platforms. A former radio news anchor, Alec brings both a background in journalism and a passion for law. His writing has been published in The Seattle…

Alec is an intern on LexBlog’s publishing team where he creates content for the company’s various digital platforms. A former radio news anchor, Alec brings both a background in journalism and a passion for law. His writing has been published in The Seattle Times and Crosscut.