It’s been a busy week for us at LexBlog as we started up our monthly webinar series again. It’s also been busy for our community, who once again made it hard to highlight only a few posts that came in this week. Among them you’ll find a new FTC rule, new environmentally focused bills in California and a clever reference to the well-known Planes, Trains and Automobiles.


Michelle’s Picks

Planes, Trains, Automobiles, and the Outside Sales Exemption

This is a really clever way to grab your audience’s attention right off the bat and pull them in enough to discuss the legal topic you have in mind. It was Colin Walsh’s title reference that intrigued me, but it was his writing and smooth transition that led to me finishing the entire post. He uses the example of the salesman selling shower curtain rings to dive into the Outside Sales Exemption. Walsh has a great writing style and his ability to interweave pop culture with employment law seamlessly makes for an interesting, unique post that stands out. Available at the Law Office of Rob Wiley’s Texas Employment Lawyer.

With Updated Safeguards Rule, FTC Signals New Wave of Cybersecurity Enforcement for Financial Institutions

Whenever new rules come into play, it’s vital to keep your audience up-to-date and informed if you want them to look at you as an authority in the realm. That’s exactly what Jessica Pedersen and Jena Valdetero do in this blog post here. They’ve put together this highly informative and detailed post in response to the FTC’s updated Safeguards Rule. They separate the post into different sections and make use of bullets so it’s easily scannable and readable. Available at Greenberg Traurig’s Data Privacy Dish.

LexisNexis CounselLink Data Reveals Law Firm Billing Rate Discrepancies Across Gender and Ethnic Groups

Speaking of being an authority/thought-leader in your realm, almost no one does that better than Jean O’Grady. Her post here is a clear example of why—she writes a timely post on LexisNexis’ CounselLink and their new data which highlights hourly billing rate discrepancies based on gender and ethnicity. She provides some helpful charts with some of the findings, bullets out the differences between associates and partners and provides a link to the program that will be discussing the findings in more detail. Available at Dewey B Strategic.


Alec’s Picks

How Creepy Is That New Product? Mozilla’s *privacy not included Privacy Guide Will Tell You

I’ve just started to do my holiday shopping and thanks to this handy blog post from Deborah George, I now have a new tool at my disposal. She writes about Mozilla’s *Privacy Not Included buyer’s guide which helps consumers learn about the safety and privacy protection (or lack thereof) of popular products. As a Firefox user, I am well acquainted with and have a great deal of respect for Mozilla, but I admittedly had not heard about this guide until this post. Sharing a useful resource with your readership makes for a great blog post and this is the perfect example. This was genuinely helpful to me, and I imagine many other readers. Available at Robinson+Cole’s Data Privacy + Cybersecurity Insider.

Baseball Versus Roller Derby – Cleveland’s Battle for the Guardians Trademark

The attempt by Cleveland’s MLB team to rebrand as The Guardians looked somewhat uncertain due to a legal dispute early this week. Not only did Josh Escovedo break it all down for us in this excellent post he also recorded a podcast episode with his colleague Scott Hervey on topic. That legal dispute is now settled, but Escovedo and Hervey did a great job jumping on this topic while it was in the news and hitting itwith a one-two punch of both a blog post and a podcast. Cross-promoting between your blog and podcast is a great strategy and something we encourage you try if you have a podcast. Available at Weintraub Tobin’s The IP Law Blog.

California Passes Sweeping Package of “Green” Bills

Rachel Hudson and Gian Ryan took a look at a package of environmentally focused bills signed into law last month by California Governor Gavin Newsom. They do a great job of providing brief explanations of each and then get into the real meat of their post—the impact those laws will have on their clients and potential clients. This is legal blogging 101, but the thing your blog has that other publications don’t is the expertise and knowledge of your attorneys and based on this post it is evident Hudson and Ryan have that in spades. Just an all around great analysis piece. Available at Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton LLP’s Real Estate, Land Use & Environmental Law Blog.

Photo of Alec Downing Alec Downing

Alec is an intern on LexBlog’s publishing team where he creates content for the company’s various digital platforms. A former radio news anchor, Alec brings both a background in journalism and a passion for law. Alec has the eventual goal of attending law…

Alec is an intern on LexBlog’s publishing team where he creates content for the company’s various digital platforms. A former radio news anchor, Alec brings both a background in journalism and a passion for law. Alec has the eventual goal of attending law school—and of course—starting his own law blog. His writing has been published in The Seattle Times and Crosscut.

Photo of Michelle Newblom Michelle Newblom

Michelle works on LexBlog’s Publishing team and assists in managing and creating the company’s editorial and social content, as well as working with clients to ensure the overall success of their blogs. She has experience working in all different realms of publishing—including newspapers,

Michelle works on LexBlog’s Publishing team and assists in managing and creating the company’s editorial and social content, as well as working with clients to ensure the overall success of their blogs. She has experience working in all different realms of publishing—including newspapers, magazines and research journals. Michelle has published a poetry book and been featured in an anthology.