The LexBlog community started off 2022 strong. We saw over 820 posts from our community members in this first week alone. Many firms published their 2021 retrospectives and 2022 forecasts while others jumped right back into writing on the topics their blogs are known for covering.


Alec’s Picks

Time Is Money: A Quick Wage-Hour Tip on … Did You Remember to Make Necessary Changes to Comply with New 2022 State and Local Wage-Hour Laws?

It’s a new year and we’re all getting back into the swing of things, but if you’re an employer you certainly do not want to forget to update your employee payroll to comply with new minimum wage and exempt salary thresholds. These rates increased once clocks struck midnight and failing to comply could mean serious consequences for your company. Thankfully Michael Kun put together this handy post which includes several charts comparing the 2021 rates to the 2022 rates in all of the states and localities that saw changes. This post serves as a friendly reminder to employers about these updated laws and also serves as a useful tool if you do still need to make these changes. All around, a great post to kick off 2022. Available at Epstein Becker & Green’s Wage and Hour Defense Blog

2021 Year in Review: Biometric and AI Litigation

2022 is underway, but we are still seeing a number of excellent 2021 year-in-review posts coming out of the LexBlog community. I particularly enjoyed this one from Squire Patton Boggs’ Consumer Privacy World which zeroed in on biometric and AI litigation over the past year. The team of authors gave us a comprehensive look at this niche legal space and did a fantastic job of linking to plenty of past blog posts throughout. The post is also nicely broken up into subsections since by their very nature, these year-in-review posts tend to be a bit longer. It’s no surprise this post was as good as it was. The team over at Consumer Privacy World have honed their skills in writing year-in-review posts with this being their fifth posted in the past couple weeks, all covering different topics. This post was written by Kristin Bryan, Christina Lamoureux and Daniel Lonergan.

Ambiguity and bad grammar

Less is more. If there was ever a post that proves it, it’s this one. In under 250 words Donald Dinnie is able to summarize an 18 page decision in this somewhat dryly humorous post about bad grammar and contracts. Blog posts never have to be treatise—in fact they shouldn’t be. If you can convey your point in fewer words, always do it. Dinnie is masterful at this and if you’re looking to cut down on unnecessary clutter in your writing, reading his posts is a great place to start. Available at Norton Rose Fulbright’s Financial Institutions Legal Snapshot.


Michelle’s Picks

How Build Back Better Bill will Affect Business Owners in 2022

I wanted my picks for this week to be mainly posts that do a great job looking ahead to 2022, as it’s a post topic we’re consistently encouraging. And there were a lot of good ones, but John Milikowsky’s on the Build Back Better Bill is definitely one of the best. He does a great job applying the contents of this bill to business owners specifically, letting them know exactly how it will affect them if the bill does indeed pass. The big takeaway is that there will be an expected increase in IRS audits as corporations will be funding a large part of the bill. Available at Milikowsky Tax Law Blog.

Workplace Law Trends for 2022

Workplace law trends can be a tricky thing to predict for the upcoming year with constant uncertainties regarding COVID and the pandemic. However, Spring Law’s Lisa Stam does a great job laying out what the future likely has in store for the industry. There are three big trends and changes she notes: the continued push for hybrid and remote work, increased scrutiny of stress leaves and harassment claim procedures and challenging older contract terms. Her writing is always very clear and understandable and this posts serves as a great resource for those not sure what to expect in 2022. Available at Employment & Human Rights Law in Canada

Breaking News: NYS DOH Issues Updated Interim Quarantine and Isolation Guidance

Alongside prediction posts for 2022, I had to include this really timely, informational post written by Jaspan Schlesinger’s Jessica Baquet. With quarantine, testing, isolation requirements changing what seems like every week now, the general public definitely needs to be up-to-date and Baquet’s post gives you all the information you’d need if you’re residing in New York. Her piece is organized really nicely, allowing you to scan the post for the information you need. It’s a quick post that compiles the relevant health information readers would need. Available at New York Labor & Employment Law Blog.

Photo of Michelle Newblom Michelle Newblom

Michelle works on LexBlog’s Publishing team and assists in managing and creating the company’s editorial and social content, as well as working with clients to ensure the overall success of their blogs. She has experience working in all different realms of publishing—including newspapers,

Michelle works on LexBlog’s Publishing team and assists in managing and creating the company’s editorial and social content, as well as working with clients to ensure the overall success of their blogs. She has experience working in all different realms of publishing—including newspapers, magazines and research journals. Michelle has published a poetry book and been featured in an anthology.

Photo of Alec Downing Alec Downing

Alec is an intern on LexBlog’s publishing team where he creates content for the company’s various digital platforms. A former radio news anchor, Alec brings both a background in journalism and a passion for law. Alec has the eventual goal of attending law…

Alec is an intern on LexBlog’s publishing team where he creates content for the company’s various digital platforms. A former radio news anchor, Alec brings both a background in journalism and a passion for law. Alec has the eventual goal of attending law school—and of course—starting his own law blog. His writing has been published in The Seattle Times and Crosscut.