Alejandra Arroyave Lopez

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“Victims of sexual harassment on the job shouldn’t hesitate to find justice. My number one goal is to listen and provide you guidance on the legal options available to you, all while respecting your confidentiality. Please do not hesitate to contact me to discuss your personal story. Hablo español.”

Latest Articles

The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Ray v. International Paper Company, released on November 28, 2018, overturned a lower federal court’s decision to dismiss Tamika Ray’s sexual harassment, hostile work environment, and retaliation claims against her employer, International Paper Company, for lack of sufficient evidence to support her claims. The FourthCircuit found Ms. Ray had presented sufficient evidence to survive summary judgment and to allow a jury to decide her claims. Tamika Ray…
  Si usted tiene una demanda de acoso sexual laboral, lo que usted reporta inicialmente a la Comisión de Igualdad de Oportunidades de Empleo (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission en inglés), y cómo lo reporta, puede afectar su demanda legal en las cortes. Antes de interponer una demanda de acoso sexual laboral en contra de su empleador bajo el Título VII de las leyes de Estados Unidos, la vícitma debe de primero presentar cargos con…
A Florida appellate court reversed a lower trial court’s decision to summarily dispose of a guidance counselor’s workplace sexual harassment claim against the Broward County School Board for the conduct of the principal of the school where she worked. The lower court had ruled that Cherellda Branch-McKenzie, the guidance counselor, did not provide evidence to support her claim sufficient for proceeding to trial. The Fourth District disagreed with the lower court in Branch-McKenzie v. Broward
If you have a claim for workplace sexual harassment, what is initially reported to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”), and how it’s reported, may affect your legal claim in court. Before filing a lawsuit based on workplace sexual harassment against an employer under Title VII, a victim is required to file a charge with the EEOC. The EEOC then issues a “right to sue” notice, which allows the victim to file his/her claim in…
If you have been experiencing persistent workplace sexual harassment for a long time, perhaps for months or even years, you may think it is too late to report the wrongdoing, but a recent federal case from the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, citing news regarding “a veritable firestorm of allegations of rampant sexual misconduct that has been closeted for years, not reported by the victims,” held that whether waiting too long to report the workplace…
You may have a situation where not only you have been the victim of sexual harassment in the workplace, but your coworkers may also have had other negative experiences with the same employer. Can all of you jointly sue the employer for workplace sexual harassment in what is called a class action or collective action? It depends. If you and your coworkers each have an employment contract with the offending employer, the fine print may…
Scandal in the Florida Legislature The Florida legislature was rocked by scandals in 2017 when two Florida Senate investigations against Sen. Jack Latvala (R-Clearwater) were prompted by six women accusing him of sexual harassment. Rep. Latvala resigned from the Senate after the investigations showed that he engaged in harassing and inappropriately touching female staffers and lobbyists, and for potentially violating public corruption laws by demanding sex in exchange for supporting lobbyist initiatives. Florida State Senator
What is the line between an uncomfortable situation at work and sexual harassment at work? An employee who believes he or she is the victim of workplace sexual harassment must subjectively perceive the harassment as sufficiently severe and pervasive to alter the terms and conditions of employment, and the subjective perception must be objectively reasonable. This means that a judge or jury will listen to your story, view it from the perspective of a reasonable…
While many claims of sexual harassment involve harassment by someone in a position of authority, the law also protects victims of sexual harassment by a co-worker. If you believe that your co-worker is engaging in frequent, severe, and pervasive conduct that is physically threatening or humiliating, and it is interfering with your job performance, you should report it to your employer.  If your employer does not take sufficient action to put measures in place to…