Allison Martin

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Allison Martin is an associate in the Labor & Employment Law Department. Allison’s practice includes a wide range of employment litigation matters at the state and federal levels, including employment discrimination arising under Title VII and similar state statutes, retaliation claims, and wage-and-hour issues. Allison also plays an important role in advising clients on employee leave policies.

At Seton Hall University School of Law, Allison was an Articles Editor for the Seton Hall Law Review. While in law school, Allison interned for Chief Judge Garrett E. Brown (Ret.) of the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey.

Latest Articles

On January 22, 2018, the Missouri Court of Appeals upheld a jury verdict awarding approximately $1.5 million in damages to a radiation oncologist after finding that she had been constructively and wrongfully terminated in violation of Missouri law (specifically, “Missouri public policy”) in retaliation for reporting alleged instances of substandard medical treatment and fraud. Kim v. Mercy Clinic Springfield Communities, Case Nos. SD34547 & SD34561. Defendant employed Plaintiff as a radiation oncologist from 2006…
A new Vermont law will require most employers to provide paid sick time to employees. Vermont is the fifth state to adopt a paid sick leave law, following Connecticut, California, Massachusetts, and Oregon.  The law will be effective on January 1, 2017. Some Key Provisions of the New Law: While the law takes effect on January 1, 2017, employers with five or fewer employees who are employed for an average of 30 hours or more…
Two courts in the Northern District of Illinois recently ruled that the Illinois Whistleblower Act (IWA) (740 ILCS § 174/5) provides for individual liability.  Bello v. Village of Skokie, No. 14-cv-1718 (N.D. Ill. Sept. 2, 2014 and Dec. 31, 2015); Hower v. Cook County Sheriff’s Office, No. 15-cv-6404 (N.D. Ill. Feb. 16, 2016).…
As 2015 comes to a close, paid sick leave remains a hot issue in New Jersey. The City of New Brunswick recently became the eleventh municipality in New Jersey to mandate paid sick leave, but will be the first city in the state to specify that leave may be used for purposes related to domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking. On the state-level, the New Jersey Senate approved a sick leave bill earlier this month…
On November 24, 2015, the ARB adopted an expansive interpretation of what constitutes an adverse action for claims asserted under the Federal Railroad Safety Act of 1982 (FRSA), holding that a reduced performance rating with no compensation-related consequences and a failure to pay medical bills in connection with a work-related accident are actionable. Fricka v. National Railroad Passenger Corp., ARB Case No. 14-047 (Nov. 24, 2015).…
Voters in Elizabeth, New Jersey overwhelmingly approved a public question on the ballot requiring private-sector employers in the city to provide paid sick leave to their employees.  Elizabeth follows the lead of multiple jurisdictions (state and local) that have adopted similar measures across the country, including the following municipalities in New Jersey:  Jersey City, Newark, Passaic, Irvington, Paterson, East Orange, Trenton, Montclair, and Bloomfield. The Interpretative Statement on the Elizabeth ballot provides that “[e]mployees who…
The Jersey City Council voted to expand the scope of the City’s existing sick leave ordinance yesterday.  Under the Ordinance as amended, employers with less than 10 employees now will be required to provide employees with up to 24 hours of paid sick leave and up to 16 hours of unpaid sick leave per year.  Small employers were previously required to provide employees with up to 40 hours of unpaid sick leave per year. The…
In August, the City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania passed an ordinance that will require most employers to provide workers with paid or unpaid sick time. Pittsburgh follows the lead of Philadelphia, which approved a similar measure earlier this year. Shortly thereafter, the Pennsylvania Restaurant and Lodging Association and a group of Pittsburgh businesses filed a challenge to Pittsburgh’s new Ordinance in state court, seeking declaratory relief to invalidate the law. Plaintiffs allege that the sick leave…
Further reflecting the divide amongst courts regarding the definition of “whistleblower” under the Dodd-Frank Act, the District Court of New Jersey recently held that an employee who internally reports an alleged securities law violation is subject to the statute’s anti-retaliation protections.  Dressler v. Lime Energy, No. 3:14-cv-07060, 2015 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 106532 (D.N.J. Aug. 13, 2015).…
The Second Circuit recently entertained oral argument in Berman v. Neo@Ogilvy, focusing on whether the Dodd-Frank whistleblower protection provision covers individuals who only complain internally about alleged securities law violations rather than reaching out to the SEC.  We previously posted on the Southern District of New York’s December 5, 2014 ruling in this matter that internal reports are not protected under Dodd-Frank, as was held in the Asadi case out of the Fifth Circuit.  We…