David Picon

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David A. Picon is a seasoned advocate for financial services firms, as well as public and private companies. He is a partner in the Litigation Department and a trial lawyer who has led dozens of trials and arbitration hearings, primarily for financial services firms. David’s practice covers a range of matters, including complex securities issues, fraudulent transfer actions, alleged Ponzi schemes, and contract and employment-related disputes. He is also co-chair of the Financial Services Group and a member of the Corporate Defense Group.

David appears in numerous judicial and administrative forums and represents financial services firms in investigations brought by the SEC, FINRA and other regulatory bodies. He also has broad experience in defending companies and directors in shareholder derivative actions and breach of fiduciary duty claims by shareholders.

Latest Articles

Yesterday, 23 law professors represented by Proskauer were granted permission to participate as amici curiae in a class action lawsuit contesting a recent U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) policy change affecting minors in New York who seek Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS).  This policy change has resulted in SIJS denials for immigrant children who would otherwise qualify for SIJS based on well-established state and federal law. SIJS is a form of immigration relief that…
Today, the U.S. Department of Labor released its highly-anticipated Final Rule and Exemptions addressing when a person providing investment advice with respect to an employee benefit plan or individual retirement account is considered to be a fiduciary under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 and the Internal Revenue Code. The new rule is expected to have significant consequences for broker-dealers and other financial professionals working with retirement accounts. Click here to read the…
Today, the U.S. Department of Labor will release its highly-anticipated Final Rule and Exemptions addressing when a person providing investment advice with respect to an employee benefit plan or individual retirement account is considered to be a “fiduciary” under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 and the Internal Revenue Code.  According to a Fact Sheet released in advance of the new rule’s publication, the “DOL has streamlined and simplified the rule to minimize…
As we wrote about here, in April the Department of Labor issued its highly anticipated, re-proposed regulation addressing the standard of care for broker-dealers and other financial professionals who provide retirement investment advice. Since its release, the proposed rule has come under fire from critics who maintain that the DOL proposal, while well intentioned, will ultimately limit access to affordable retirement services and result in investor confusion. Last week, the chorus of opposition grew louder…
Earlier this month, the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (“SIFMA”) released its “Proposed Best Interests of the Customer Standard for Broker-Dealers” – an alternative to the U.S. Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) proposed regulation addressing the standard of care for broker-dealers and other financial professionals who provide retirement investment advice.  Unlike the DOL’s proposed rule, which we wrote about here, SIFMA’s across-the-board proposal emphasizes disclosure and investor consent as mechanisms to promote…
Last week, Richard Ketchum, Chairman and CEO of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”), doubled-down on his recent criticism of the U.S. Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) proposed regulation addressing the standard of care for broker-dealers providing retirement investment advice. Speaking at FINRA’s annual conference, Chairman Ketchum said that, while he supports a “best interests of the customer” standard, the DOL’s proposal – which we wrote about here – is “not the appropriate way to…
On May 1, 2015, Richard Ketchum, Chairman and CEO of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”), reaffirmed his support for a uniform fiduciary standard for broker-dealers. Testifying before the House Financial Services Committee, Chairman Ketchum emphasized that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) – and not the U.S. Department of Labor (the “DOL”) – is best suited to establish and implement a new industry-wide standard of care. Chairman Ketchum’s comments come less than…
The SEC recently approved FINRA’s proposed new rule changes to the definitions of public arbitrator (FINRA Rules 12100(u) and 13100(u)) and non-public arbitrator (FINRA Rules 12100(p) and 13100(p)), after receiving over 300 comment letters in addition to two letters from FINRA responding to the comment letters.  The new rule significantly limits the pool of potential public arbitrators by, chiefly, permanently disqualifying any person who worked in the financial industry from being a public arbitrator.  FINRA…
On February 3, 2015, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) issued its Report on Cybersecurity Practices. Reinforcing FINRA’s emphasis on protecting investor information, the report discusses the results of a recent industry-wide cybersecurity examination and presents a list of principles and best practices to guide the industry’s cybersecurity efforts going forward. 2014 Cybersecurity Examination Last year, FINRA conducted a targeted examination of certain firms in the financial services industry. The examination sought information about various…
Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”) examiners stated on Monday that they will no longer make recommendations on how banks can better comply with anti-money laundering (“AML”) regulations.  Rather, the policy change designates all AML problems either as matters requiring attention or as violations of law.  Thus, all AML problems could see enforcement actions if they are not addressed quickly. Previously, in certain instances, the OCC provided recommendations to the banks it oversaw…