Epstein Becker & Green, P.C.

Latest Articles

by Allen B. Roberts, Frank C. Morris, Jr., and Michael J. Slocum In what has been reported to be the first decision permitting a retaliation claim under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (“Dodd-Frank”) to survive dismissal, the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut (“Court”) has adopted a broad view of who qualifies as a “whistleblower” under that law. The Court rejected an employer’s request for a…
by Allen B. Roberts, Stuart M. Gerson, Frank C. Morris, Jr., and Michael J. Slocum Our previous postings have noted the progression of decisions during the past two years by the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) Administrative Review Board (“ARB”) that have liberally expanded substantive provisions of whistleblower statutes under its jurisdiction. Now, the ARB has enabled whistleblowers to maintain their administrative complaints and survive dismissal in circumstances where recital of the…
by Allen B. Roberts and Michael J. Slocum Under a final rule (“Final Rule”) issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”), commercial motor carriers that own or lease a vehicle in a business affecting interstate commerce or assign employees to operate such a vehicle are impacted by Surface Transportation Assistance Act of 1982 (“STAA”) whistleblower protections available to drivers of commercial motor vehicles (including independent contractors when personally operating a commercial motor vehicle),…
by Allen B. Roberts, Frank C. Morris, Jr., Stuart M. Gerson, and Michael J. Slocum The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (“Dodd-Frank”) extended Sarbanes-Oxley’s whistleblower protection provision beyond employees of publicly-traded companies to reach the employees of their privately-held subsidiaries as well.  Reasoning that this extension was “a clarification of Congress’s intent with respect to the Sarbanes-Oxley whistleblower provision,” a federal court held that the extension applies retroactively…
by Allen B. Roberts and Michael J. Slocum Global whistleblowers cannot look to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (“Dodd-Frank”) for protection against retaliation, according to a recent federal court decision.  Taking an important step towards clarifying the reach of Dodd-Frank, and potentially impacting other statutes having similar provisions, the court ruled that the “Anti-Retaliation Provision” protecting whistleblowers under Dodd-Frank does not apply outside the territorial United States. Asadi v.
by Frank C. Morris, Jr., and Allen B. Roberts The U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) Administrative Review Board (“ARB”) has sounded an alarm that needs to be heard by accounting firms, law firms, and other consultants, advisors, and providers of services to publicly traded companies.  With its recent decision in Spinner v. David Landau & Associates, LLC, ARB Case Nos. 10-111, 10-115 (May 31, 2012), the ARB continued its expansion of whistleblower protection, holding…
The April issue of “Take 5: Views You Can Use,” written by David W. Garland, a Member of the Firm in Epstein Becker Green’s New York and Newark  Offices, discusses a number of topics relevant to employment in the financial services industry.   In these times of continuing downsizing at many financial services firms, we particularly recommend the discussions of the EEOC’s amended rules governing the defenses to disparate impact claims based on age, and a recent case regarding…
Written By:  Eric J. Conn OSHA is signaling a major departure from its position on acceptable exceptions to the Lockout/Tagout requirements in the agency’s electrical safety standards. Historically, employers have been permitted to conduct electrical maintenance near energized parts in data centers that host critical business operations (i.e., operations which must stay live 24/7), under an “infeasibility” exception to the general rule that electrical equipment must be deenergized and locked out before maintenance is…
By Stuart M. Gerson Lawson v. Fidelity Management & Research LLC, et al., No. 10-2240 (1st Cir. Feb. 3, 2012) (pdf), discussed in our February 16 posting, comes as a welcome development to privately-held companies that are providers of health care goods and services because it should, if followed generally, preclude whistleblowers from bringing the kinds of audit-related and financial accounting claims that are within the compass of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX). Many of…
By: Christina Fletcher Confronting an issue of first impression, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit recently held that the “whistleblower” protections of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“SOX”) cover only employees of public companies, and do not extend to the employees of a public company’s contractors or subcontractors which are themselves private companies. Lawson v. Fidelity Management & Research LLC, et al., No. 10-2240 (1st Cir. Feb. 3, 2012) (pdf). This holding provides…