Katie Clark

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Katie Clark has significant experience advising on all aspects of contentious and non-contentious employment matters. Katie’s client base spans multiple business sectors and includes global corporations, financial institutions, FTSE 100 companies, manufacturing companies, service providers and start-ups. Katie is noted for her commercial approach to assisting clients to deal with employment issues ranging from day-to-day employee relations, to negotiating public limited company (PLC) board director contracts and significant business restructuring. Read Katie Clark's full bio.

Latest Articles

In case you have been distracted by other recent events in the UK, here is a reminder that the compensation limits on Employment Tribunal awards and certain other amounts payable under UK employment legislation increased as of the first week of April 2019. This alert sets out the changes in full and highlights important consequences for employers. Access the full article.
Whilst 2017 was anticipated to be a fairly static year for UK employment law, that did not in fact prove to be the case, and there were various notable developments. To a large degree, 2018 is likely to be defined by the ongoing Brexit negotiations and the passage of the EU Withdrawal Bill, which will, amongst other things, lay the framework for the future movement of EU workers to the United Kingdom. Employers should, however,…
The UK Employment Appeal Tribunal has upheld the Employment Tribunal’s finding that Uber drivers are “workers”. It rejected Uber’s argument that Uber is simply a technology platform acting as an agent to connect self-employed Uber drivers with users of the ride-hailing app. What Is the Issue? The United Kingdom recognises three categories of employment status: employees, workers and self-employed contractors, each with varying levels of protection under employment law. Employees and workers are afforded greater…
McDermott’s “Key Employment Law Events in 2017 and Beyond” update highlighted the upcoming regulations requiring certain employers to report on the gender pay gap in their workforce (Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017) (the Regulations). Under these Regulations, from April 2017, large private and voluntary sector UK employers will be required annually to calculate and publish a range of gender pay information regarding their workforce. Read full article.
Current indications are that 2017 may be a fairly static year as regards to employment law. Whilst it is anticipated the government will trigger Article 50 to start Brexit negotiations, these are likely to last for at least two years, and existing employment laws are unlikely to feel any ripple effect from leaving the European Union for some time. In the meantime, the Prime Minister has asked for a review, expected to take around six…
As you may have seen from the extensive press coverage, the UK Employment Tribunal has delivered its much anticipated judgment in Aslam and Farrar v Uber. The case was about whether Uber drivers are self-employed contractors, or are “workers” with rights to minimum wage, statutory holidays, sick pay and breaks, amongst other workers’ rights. Read the full article.