Kathryn Rattigan

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Kathryn Rattigan is a member of the Business Litigation Group and the Data Privacy and Security Team. She concentrates her practice on privacy and security compliance under both state and federal regulations and advising clients on website and mobile app privacy and security compliance. Kathryn helps clients review, revise and implement necessary policies and procedures under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). She also provides clients with the information needed to effectively and efficiently handle potential and confirmed data breaches while providing insight into federal regulations and requirements for notification and an assessment under state breach notification laws. Prior to joining the firm, Kathryn was an associate at Nixon Peabody. She earned her J.D., cum laude, from Roger Williams University School of Law and her B.A., magna cum laude, from Stonehill College. She is admitted to practice law in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Read her full rc.com bio here.

Latest Articles

Last week, Intel announced two separate collaborations with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) and the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) to improve bridge inspections using drones. Intel and the KYTC have actually used its drones technology to help inspect and analyze the Daniel Carter Beard Bridge, which is an 8-lane interstate that crosses the Ohio River with over 100,000 vehicles crossing the bridge daily. With that much traffic, even a lane closure can result in…
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Reauthorization Act comes with a new set of regulations for drone manufacturers. The FAAs rule is intended to impose safety standards on manufacturers. While drone operators will face stricter scrutiny and enforcement under the Act, the FAA now also wants drone manufacturers to be responsible for implementing safety standards that will essentially force compliance by drone operators. The obligations on drone manufacturers are set forth in Section 345 of the…
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Langley Research Centers has taken on the challenge of using drones in GPS-deprived environments, so it gathered a group of students from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to help find a solution for that problem. Those MIT students came back to NASA with a plan for a fleet of drones that can autonomously fly through a thickly vegetated forest, communicate with one another and create a 3-D…
This week, the New York Police Department (NYPD) announced that it will be adding a fleet of crime-fighting drones to its ranks. The NYPD plans to roll out 14 drones as part of its technology “evolution.” Police Commissioner James O’Neill said, “As the largest municipal police department in the United States, the NYPD must always be willing to leverage the benefits of new and always-improving technology.” The hope is that these drones will enable the…
The International Organization for Standardization (IOS) released the first draft of a set of global standards for drone use. The draft suggests no-fly zones around airports and other restricted areas, and geofencing measures to keep drones away from certain sensitive areas (e.g., critical infrastructure). The draft standards also instruct drone operators to respect others’ privacy and the requirement for a human intervention fail-safe for all flights. Additionally, the IOS suggests that training, flight logging and…
Last week, a drone pilot was arrested for flying his drone into Barclays bank building during violent winds. Steve Funes operated his drone from the balcony of his 21st floor room at The Executive Plaza Hotel on West 51st Street. The crash occurred on nearby 7th Avenue. While the Barclays bank building was not damaged, the drone fell to the ground where it could have injured a passerby. The buildings security guards found the drone…
Last week, a new audit report was released regarding the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) unmanned aircraft system (UAS or drone) waiver process. According to the audit, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) has found room for improvement. In particular, the FAA’s timeliness in response to waiver requests could improve. The audit was conducted between May 2017 and September 2018, focusing on the FAA’s methods of approving waivers under the Small UAS Part 107 regulations…
The Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) nationwide deployment of the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC) system has processed more than 50,000 applications from drone operators for authorization to fly in controlled airspace since November 2017. The LAANC system now covers about 300 air traffic facilities that service approximately 500 airports, and provides nearly instant approval for drone operators to operate in these controlled airspaces. LAANC uses airspace data provided through temporary flight restrictions, Notices…
People don’t think of their cars as IoT devices. Our cars are increasingly more connected by Wi-Fi, what does that mean for data collection about the driver? Our cars are collecting much more data than you think. [view related posts here and here]. Cars can collect information related to where you’ve been, what you’re listening to and what kind of coffee you drink. From brakes to windshield wipers, most new cars have up to…
One-hundred (100) Intel drones will hit the stage this holiday season at Radio City Music Hall to perform with the Rockettes in the production of the Christmas Spectacular. The Intel Shooting Star mini drones will create a light show using choreographed movements to create holiday-themed silhouettes in a new finale scene called “Christmas Lights.” Executive Vice President of Productions for The Madison Square Garden Co., Victoria Parker, said, “We are thrilled to announce that Intel…