Kathryn Rattigan

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Kathryn Rattigan is a member of the Business Litigation Group and the Data Privacy and Security Team. She concentrates her practice on privacy and security compliance under both state and federal regulations and advising clients on website and mobile app privacy and security compliance. Kathryn helps clients review, revise and implement necessary policies and procedures under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). She also provides clients with the information needed to effectively and efficiently handle potential and confirmed data breaches while providing insight into federal regulations and requirements for notification and an assessment under state breach notification laws. Prior to joining the firm, Kathryn was an associate at Nixon Peabody. She earned her J.D., cum laude, from Roger Williams University School of Law and her B.A., magna cum laude, from Stonehill College. She is admitted to practice law in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Read her full rc.com bio here.

Latest Articles

This week, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) released an updated interim rule in the Federal Register which requires drone owners to display their FAA-issued registration number on the external surface of the drone. Owners and operators may no longer place or write registration numbers in an interior compartment.  However, the final rule does not change the acceptable methods of external marking and it does not specify on which external surface the registration number must be…
Intel won’t disclose exactly how it was able to participate in the Super Bowl LIII halftime show, but it did disclose that it used 150 Intel Shooting Star drones to spell out the words “ONE” and “LOVE” during the musical performance. As Maroon 5 began singing “She Will be Loved,” Intel initiated its software directing 150 drones to float up and over the enclosed field. This show beat Intel’s previous indoor world record when it…
Last week, the EasyMile electric autonomous shuttle debuted on the roads in Denver, Colorado, marking the first autonomous vehicle venture in the state. The EasyMile is a self-driving shuttle that is scheduled to operate for the next 4-6 months connecting passengers from commuter rail stations to the EasyMile office and Park-n-Ride lots. The goal of this venture is to “assess the viability of autonomous services in providing first and last mile connections to and from…
Last week, Florida skin care spa, Medspa Del Mar LLC (Medspa) was hit with a Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) class action in federal court for allegedly using an automatic dialing system to send unwanted text messages advertising its treatments. Lead plaintiff claims that Medspa invaded her and other class members’ privacy by sending a series of impersonal, generic messages without their express written consent as required by the TCPA. The complaint includes screenshots of…
Last week, reports of “drone activity” temporarily halted flights at the Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had to briefly hold arrivals due to “reports of drone activity north of the airport earlier that evening.” The airport had to coordinate with the FAA and federal law enforcement authorities to investigate the reports, which came from crews of both Southwest and United Airlines flights. The FAA did not confirm the…
Last week, Boeing completed the first test flight of its autonomous passenger aircraft prototype in Manassas, Virginia. The prototype is 30-feet long and 28-feet wide, powered by an electric propulsion system with a flight range of about 50 miles. The flight was successful, completing a controlled takeoff, hover and landing. Boeing hopes to test forward, wing-borne flight as well as the transition phase between vertical and forward-flight modes. Boeing Chief Technology Officer, Greg Hyslop, said,…
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been busy even in the midst of the government shutdown. Last week, Department of Transportation (DOT) Secretary Elaine Chao unveiled a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS or drones) flights over people and at night. For flights over people, the regulation breaks UAS into three categories: Category 1: Includes all UAS that weigh 0.55 pounds or less. These UAS will be permitted to fly over people…
A California federal judge held that a standard comprehensive general liability (CGL) aircraft exclusion barred liability coverage for injuries suffered as a result of drone operations. The injuries occurred when a wedding photographer used a drone to capture images at a wedding reception and the drone hit a guest who sustained serious injuries, including loss of sight in one eye. The court determined that the insurance company could recover the costs incurred by the company…
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a memorandum last year announcing that its inspectors were now authorized to use camera-equipped unmanned aircraft systems (UAS or drones) to collect evidence during inspections. This means that OSHA inspectors are authorized to conduct in-person inspections of the workplace as well as remote-controlled aircraft inspections above the workplace to uncover safety violations. This has raised some concerns for employers. Among those concerns, is an employee’s Fourth Amendment…
State Farm has become the very first company in the United States to receive a waiver from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for drone operations over people and beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS). The waiver is valid until November 2022. Senior Vice President for P&C Claims, Robert Yi, said, “The waiver will provide our claims specialists with another way to efficiently help customers. We can use drones to assess on-the-ground damage and deploy resources.”…