Latest Articles

The California Attorney General continued its series of public forums regarding the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), with forums last week in Riverside (January 24, 2019) and Los Angeles (January 25, 2019). As in the previous forums, there were a significant number of attendees, but few elected to speak publicly regarding their views on the Act. You can read our reports on the public forums held earlier this month in San Francisco and San Diego
In anticipation of preparing rules to implement the California Consumer Privacy Act, the California Attorney General recently announced six public forums that he will host in January and February 2019 across California.  On January 8, 2019, the AG hosted the first of these forums in San Francisco.  The following provides an overview of the forum and the comments made at the forum. Overview of the January 8, 2019, San Francisco Forum  Stacey Schesser, the Supervising Deputy Attorney…
With the passage of the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (AB 375), the United States now has its first truly sweeping privacy regime. On Thursday, June 28, 2018, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law what is arguably the most expansive privacy legislation in U.S. history. The Act is the product of backroom wrangling between legislators, industry, and the primary sponsor of a ballot initiative by the same name. Proposed just last week as…
Financial institutions in the United States are no strangers to privacy regulations, particularly given the obligations imposed by the federal Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (“GLBA”) and the California Financial Information Privacy Act (“SB1”).  More recently, financial institutions have been focused on whether and/or the extent to which the EU’s GDPR may apply to their U.S. operations.  Many financial institutions, however, have yet to consider an equally important U.S. privacy development—the California Consumer Privacy Act (“Act”), a ballot initiative likely to appear…
Since 1993, the Ohio Workers’ Compensation Act (O.R.C. §4123), has provided firefighters and police officers additional workers’ compensation benefits. Specifically, it is presumed that firefighters and police officers who suffer from cardiovascular, pulmonary, or respiratory disease after being exposed to heat, smoke, toxic gases, chemical fumes and other toxic substances during the course of their employment, obtained it through the course of and arising out of their employment. Additionally, this section expands the traditional two…
Before predicting the long-term effects of the 2016 Presidential Election, it is worth spending time on issues to be addressed before the end of President Obama’s term. The next two and a half months will be critical as the 114th Congress addresses important issues before turning over the reins. In the upcoming weeks, Congress will be faced with a decision regarding the current continuing resolution funding the government, which expires on December 9, 2016. Back…
Earlier this year, we reviewed the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (“EEOC”) proposed enforcement guidelines regarding retaliation claims. After a 30-day comment period and input from approximately 60 individuals and organizations, on August 25, 2016, the EEOC released the final version of the Enforcement Guidance on Retaliation and Related Issues (“Guidance”). The Guidance comes nearly 20 years after the release of the EEOC’s last guidance on retaliation, during which time the Courts and the EEOC have…
On July 13, 2016, the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) released a proposed revised Employer Information Report (EEO-1) (“Proposed Revision”). This slightly changes the original EEOC proposal to add compensation and hours worked data to the EEO-1 Report. An example of the proposed EEO-1 report can be found here. The EEOC has always required employers with more than 100 employees (more than 50 employees for federal contractors) to file EEO-1…
The Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued its Persuader Activity Advice Exemption Rule (“persuader rule”), which requires attorneys and consultants who communicate with employers regarding certain labor relation activities to file a report disclosing the terms of their arrangement, including payments. Since the persuader rule was issued in final form, multiple lawsuits have been filed by employers, attorney organizations, and states. On June 27, 2016, Judge Sam Cummings of the Northern District of Texas…
Massachusetts appears to have followed California’s lead in opening a litigation floodgate over ZIP code collection at the point of sale. In 2011, the California Supreme Court held in Pineda v. Williams-Sonoma Stores, Inc., 246 P.3d 612 (Cal. 2011), that a retailer illegally collects personal identification information (PII) when it requests and records ZIP codes from customers paying by credit card. More than 240 class action lawsuits followed. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court’s recent…