Psyche Tai (HK)

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Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect (Shenzhen Connect) is expected to be launched in the second half of November 2016, according to the Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing Limited (HKEX). Shenzhen Connect, upon launch, will mark another milestone in HKEX’s market connectivity with Mainland China. The following documents have been published by HKEX to facilitate the business and technical preparation of participants: Revised Information Book for Market Participants Revised Frequently Asked Questions Proposed amendments to the Rules
On 16 August 2016, the Securities and Futures Commission of Hong Kong (SFC) and the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC) jointly announced the approval, in principle, of the establishment of Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect, which will provide mutual stock market access between Hong Kong and Shenzhen via a northbound Shenzhen trading link and a southbound Hong Kong trading link. …
On 6 July 2016, The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong Limited (the Exchange) updated its Guidance Letter GL25-11 (the Guidance Letter), which sets out the conditions for waiving a listing applicant’s strict compliance with Main Board Rule 4.04(1) and GEM Rules 7.03(1) and 11.10 (the Relevant Rule Waiver) (Note). The update made was to paragraph 4.3 of the Guidance Letter, whereby the Exchange has clarified that it will NOT ordinarily grant the Relevant Rule Waiver…
We reacted with skepticism in an earlier post about a case reported last November 2nd questioning whether an owner’s religion can be imputed to a corporation, or that the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“ACA,” or “Obamacare”) violates either the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (known as “RFRA”) or the First Amendment. There has been a split in court decisions, and we “anticipate[d] an ultimate decision from the Supreme Court.”  We are now a step…
Employees working under non-compete agreements often wonder whether they can begin working for a competitor without breaching their non-compete agreement. Many factors determine whether an employee will be found to have breached a non-compete agreement. Under Florida law, a party enforcing a non-compete agreement must establish at least one legitimate business interest. Further, there are several defenses an employee can rely on when opposing enforcement of a non-compete agreement. In a recent post, I discussed a…
Last week we started what has become a lively debate on the issue of discussing race in the workplace — an idea raised by the President in his recent heartfelt press conference.  The issue has been seized upon by Corporate Counsel, which has quoted both Lorene Schaefer, who contributed an incisive comment to our blog, and me. As Lorene just wrote in a new blog post, “In my last post, I encouraged employers to anticipate and…
Well, I think that we’ve established that there is, indeed, a word that is so sexually harassing that it may very well rival the “N-word.”   Our post last week about the “N-word” and sexually harassing words drew a lot of comments, especially when we asked whether there might be a similar sexually harassing word as severe as the “N-word” in the race context that a single usage might constitute a hostile work environment.  In all of the racial harassment cases…
We were overwhelmed with thoughtful comments to our recent post which questioned whether comments in the workplace such as “I love your new haircut” were harassment, mere sexual banter, or simply harmless compliments.   Most readers agreed that tone and context are of paramount importance, but there was still a lot of debate.  Read some of the many comments below.     Barbara Hewson, a Barrister in the UK, writes:  “There is nothing wrong with compliments in the workplace, and they should be acknowledged…
Our post about the “N-Word” and sexually harassing words drew a lot of comments.  Let’s give Laurie Butler, a labor relations specialist from Nashville, the last word on this one. We noted two federal appellate decisions which seemed to diverge when it came to the courts’ different perceptions as to the severity of a particular racial epithet as compared to various sexually harassing comments. A single use of the “N-Word” drew one court’s ire, while a whole series of sexually harassing comments…
  Deborah Scroggin, a reader from Florida writes this, and more:   “I believe asking the military chain of command to police itself with regard to sexual assaults is just as ridiculous as a CPA firm performing its own audit. There has to be an unbiased third party and/or panel that can investigate and prosecute so there is no internal sphere of influence.   It’s only fair, for someone who volunteers to serve for our…