Susy Hassan

Latest Articles

With the issuance of its third guidance document on workplace social media policies in the past year, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) continues to refine its position on how to craft workplace social media policies that are consistent with the terms of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Section 7 of the NLRA provides employees with the right to engage in “concerted activities for the purpose of collective bargaining or other mutual aid or…
According to press reports, a growing number of employers require job applicants to disclose their login information for Facebook or other social media accounts as a condition of employment.  While this practice may very well fall on the wrong side of the law, lawyers and lawmakers are still in the process of establishing the framework for legal analysis and of spreading the word about the legal risks involved with demanding this type of private…
Online social networking, and its capacity to connect our professional lives to our personal lives, have introduced a variety of new legal issues in the workplace – issues that we explore regularly in Socially Aware. Many managers and supervisors have connected with subordinates on social networking sites, and have likely wondered about the practical and legal implications of doing so. Applying long-standing legal concepts to this new context, a number of potential issues stand out.…
Employers have long used non-compete and non-solicitation agreements to prevent former employees from taking unfair advantage of confidential information, including client information, to which they received access during their employment. The growth of social media, however, is raising complex new issues for employers seeking to protect such company confidences from misuse by ex-employees. For example, if a former employee subject to a non-compete or non-solicitation agreement connects with a company client or former coworker on…
On August 18, 2011, the National Labor Relations Board’s (“NLRB”) Office of the General Counsel released a report discussing the outcome of fourteen cases that its Division of Advice has investigated this year involving social media use in the employment context.  While the report does not reflect actual decisions of the NLRB, it does indicate the thinking of the NLRB’s Chief Attorney, who sets guidelines for what cases will be presented to the NLRB for litigation…
The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) remains vigilant regarding the interaction between social media and the workplace, and has continued to focus on the impact of restrictive social media policies on employee rights under the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”).  In an effort to issue uniform guidance on this emerging issue, all NLRB regional offices are now required to submit social media disputes to the NLRB’s Division of Advice before taking any action.  Specifically, the…