Stephanie E. Lewis

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Stephanie E. Lewis is the Office Managing Principal of the Greenville, South Carolina, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. She is the Co-Chair of the Pay Equity Resource Group. Ms. Lewis represents employers in employment litigation and advises clients on preventive practices and policies to avoid litigation.

Ms. Lewis has handled all aspects of employment law but focuses on sexual harassment, pay discrimination, and disability discrimination issues in the automotive, manufacturing, retail, and pharmaceutical industries. She regularly presents on employment-related topics to Bar and industry groups.

Ms. Lewis served as a law clerk for Karen Johnson Williams of the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals and Patrick Michael Duffy of the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina.

While attending law school, she served as Articles Editor of the North Carolina Law Review and received the James E. and Carolyn B. Davis Award for Character and Service.

Latest Articles

The Jackson Lewis Pay Equity Resource Group is pleased to announce a special series to help employers prepare for Equal Pay Day. “Rethinking Pay Equity” will take a look at several of the biggest questions facing employers in the ever-evolving #equalpay landscape, including: How can prior salary information perpetuate the persistent pay gap, and how should we measure and address the impact of years-long reliance on such information in the hiring process? What data should…
A U.S. District Judge for the District of Columbia vacated the Office of Management and Budget’s (OMB) stay of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) revised EEO-1 form and the September 15, 2017, Federal Register Notice implementing the stay (Staying the Effectiveness of the EEO-1 Pay Data Collection, 82 Fed. Reg. 43362). Nat’l Women’s Law Ctr. et al. v. OMB et al., No. 17-2458 (D.D.C. Mar. 4, 2019). The court immediately restored the prior directives…
Philadelphia’s ban on salary history inquiries violates the First Amendment, a federal district court in Philadelphia has ruled in a 54-page opinion. The Chamber of Commerce for Greater Philadelphia v. City of Philadelphia et al., No. 17-1548 (Apr. 30, 2018). Because the decision is based on the First Amendment, it has broader implications for salary history inquiry bans passed by various state and local governments. The case arose from a City of Philadelphia wage equity…
The National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) has published a report based on the most recent U.S. Census Bureau data showing that women earn 80 cents for every dollar paid to their male counterparts across 97% of occupations. The report finds the wage gap is due in part to the fact that women are overrepresented in low-wage jobs, and underrepresented in high-wage jobs. Even when comparing women and men in the same occupations, the report finds…
In recent months, several states and localities have passed laws and ordinances banning inquiries into an applicant’s prior compensation, including in California, Massachusetts, Delaware, New York City, Oregon, Puerto Rico, San Francisco, and Philadelphia. There are similar laws currently under consideration in a number of other states, and this topic is bound to be a key focus for lawmakers in 2018. Companies in jurisdictions with already enacted laws should ensure they enter the New Year…
The U.S. Chamber of Commerce (the “Chamber”), along with several business associations, has requested that the Office of Management and Budget (“OMB”) rescind its prior approval of the EEOC’s revised EEO-1 Report requiring disclosure of pay data information by gender, race, and occupational category due to the cost and time associated with compliance. The Chamber’s request was backed by the Society for Human Resource Management, National Restaurant Association, National Retail Federation, National Automobile Dealers Association,…
The Chamber of Commerce for Greater Philadelphia is challenging the constitutionality of Philadelphia’s Wage History Ordinance in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. It also seeks a preliminary injunction of the Ordinance, which is scheduled to take effect on May 23, 2017. Click here to read the full article on this ordinance and its implications for employers.…