What happened? Today the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into effect, ending the data protection landscape as we know it. This comprehensive privacy law applies directly to the 28 EU countries and companies established in or doing business in those countries. View Full Post
As previously reported, the Supreme Court on November 29 heard arguments in Carpenter v. United States, an important privacy case about the Fourth Amendment’s application to 127 days’ worth of a criminal suspect’s cell-site location information. While the Court has yet to decide the case, its decisions last week in Byrd v. View Full Post
In Bailey v. Oakwood Healthcare, Inc., No. 17-2158 (April 23, 2018), the 11th Circuit found that an employer’s decision to terminate an employee on the day she returned from maternity leave was not discriminatory because during her leave, the employer discovered deficiencies in performance and falsifications in her employment application.  View Full Post
It’s finally here. As from today the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) applies throughout the European Union. Any entity that “processes” personal data will be subject to the GDPR. “Processing” is widely defined and catches virtually anything an entity does with data, from collection and storage through to analysis, sharing and destruction. View Full Post
Listeners to our webinar on Wednesday will recall the discussion of the sanctions in play against the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, also known as North Korea). Of particular interest to the global business community had been the forthcoming summit between President Trump of the United States and Kim Jong Un, Leader of the DPRK, set to take place on 12 June in Singapore.   View Full Post
According to recent data provided by CBOE and CME Group, the volatility and total volume of bitcoin futures in 2018 have been in a gradual decline.  As displayed in the chart below, the Cboe bitcoin futures contract (XBT) volatility for the lead month declined in each month to begin 2018.  View Full Post
On April 11, 2018, Arizona amended its data breach notification law (the “amended law”). The amended law will require persons, companies and government agencies doing business in the state to notify affected individuals within 45 days of determining that a breach has resulted in or is reasonably likely to result in substantial economic loss to affected individuals. View Full Post