John DiGilio

Latest from John DiGilio - Page 3

Access to the most current and reliable information is a prerequisite to sound decision-making and innovative thinking. Yet too many knowledge workers are tasked with finding information on their own, on the open internet, and increasingly that includes workers who often are not experienced or trained in doing information research and content discovery. We all know that content uncovered by popular search engines like Google or Bing is often neither the most current, nor reliable.…
Your business may not need a library, but it needs a librarian! For everything from risk management to productivity enhancement, librarians pay for themselves, and then some. Worried about putting a librarian on staff?  How about a virtual librarian, at your service? It’s flexible, affordable, and pays for itself in many different ways.…
In February, I will have the honor of presenting an overview of a white paper on which my team at LibSource has been working.  We have been reviewing various content aggregation platforms and discussing their value within the legal research industry.  Fortuitously, this is happening at the same time that the juggernaut, now dubbed “fake news”, turned the world of social media on its head.  As both a response to the controversy  and a preview…
Visualizations continue to crop up in legal research software. This trend has been occurring for a handful of years now, and has been a topic I’ve spent a lot of time researching and talking about. The question is, can a visualization make a specific area of legal researching easier, faster, better, more relevant, etc? We have seen them in a lot of different arenas: Ravel incorporating visualizations into case law research, Monitor Suite and Bloomberg…
Re-imagining the civic role of libraries in our technological age is an intriguing subject to me. So, when an article sidebar espouses the innovative ways public libraries have reinvented themselves in order to play a central civic role in their various towns and cities, my ears perk up and my eyes open. I just wanted to pass along Deborah Fallows sidebar article “The Library Card” which appeared in the March 2016 edition of The Atlantic
AALL reports this morning the name change proposal failed. A little more than 4 out of every 5 votes received were against the name change. AALL will continue to be the American Association of Law Libraries rather than the proposed Association for Legal Information. Nearly 60% of the membership voted on the proposal, which AALL is reporting is a record number. So, what does all of this mean? Judging by the pre-voting arguments posted on the AALL message boards,…
Though I have been accused of having “grizzly bear” hair by a certain toddler who shares a house with me, I have not been hibernating for the winter. I would not hold it against you if you thought that was the case, though–it has been a couple of months since I’ve posted a blog. But unlike those comatose endotherms who are contently slumbering away another cold and snowy winter, I have been (relatively) busy. The big…
If you are a member of the American Association of Law Libraries and have not been living under that proverbial rock as of late, you are probably more than well aware that the organization is eagerly awaiting the results of the vote on a proposed name change. As the deadline to cast ballots nears, I want to encourage everyone who is a member to have your opinion counted. It takes just minutes and the result…
Continuing its innovative approach to docket research and retrieval, PacerPro has announced the release of its exciting new litigant profiling functionality. Attorneys and researchers seeking to look beyond just the dockets to the bigger picture of a litigation are sure to be pleased. The platform’s already intuitive and simple approach to docket research becomes even more robust and integral with this new capability.…
AALL has begun the process to potentially change its name to the Association for Legal Information. Of course, the key change is the subtraction of the word “libraries”. Motivating this change, AALL reports “today, 51 percent of AALL members do not have ‘librarian’ in their titles, and 57 percent work in an organization that does not have ‘library’ in the name”. The potential name change was announced in the November 12th, AALL E-Briefing