Johnson & Hunter, Inc.

Johnson & Hunter, Inc., is a legal communication consulting firm providing professional development for lawyers. We teach persuasion and advocacy for litigators and public speaking skills for transactional attorneys. Founded by Brian K. Johnson in 1980, our company trains lawyers—and only lawyers—through lectures, small group workshops, and individual coachings, and by serving on the faculties of trial advocacy skills and appeals programs. Our books, on-demand videos, and articles support our techniques for public speaking, advocacy, and mock trial training. Brian K. Johnson and Marsha Hunter are the principal consultants. Our company is based in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Johnson & Hunter, Inc. Blogs

Blog Authors

Latest from Johnson & Hunter, Inc.

Does your voice trail off at the end of your sentences? It is natural for your voice to fade at the end of a sentence as you run short of breath. Soft-spoken people especially tend to trail off on the final phrase or word of a sentence. When listeners cannot understand a speaker, it is often the case that the endings of sentences are too soft. To counter this tendency, consciously speak more loudly as…
There is a critical gap between your brain’s capacity to know something and your body’s ability to know how to do it physically. Practice bridges that gap. What your brain knows and understands, your body must practice to execute well. Suppose, for example, you wish to become an expert downhill skier. You read the best book available on the techniques required. Assume, too, that you’re blessed with a photographicmemory and are able to remember every…
A mantra of our public speaking techniques is breathe in and speak out. Breathe in to fill your lungs, and once they’re filled, use the air in your lungs to power your voice. From the dawn of time until the advent of the microphone, public speakers had to be able to project their voices at great volume. Imagine Caesar addressing the Roman legions, or Lincoln delivering the Gettysburg Address to upwards of fifteen thousand listeners—outdoors and…
Many of our techniques address “Speaking well as you think on your feet,” and we also have advice for speaking while sitting. You will be required to speak sitting down at times throughout your career, of course. Whether engaged in a group practice meeting, a client meeting, or presenting on a panel in front of microphones, take care that you think about your body position as you sit, just as you do while standing on your…
Last week I lectured for the second time on a new topic. For my first presentation ten days earlier, I had worked assiduously on the structure, headline subjects, and visual aids. Making changes as I rehearsed, I recopied my written notes several times. Here’s a graphic from that first version. Anticipating the next lecture just ten days later, I saved my notes (which consist mostly of memory-triggering words) and practiced as I refined my thoughts.…
When writing our book The Articulate Witness: An Illustrated Guide to Testifying Under Oath, we combed through books, brochures, and web sites about witness preparation and compiled the collective wisdom of judges, lawyers, and court administrators.   Here is some of the most common advice we found. Use it to help prepare your client for the witness chair. The complete list is found in the book, available here. Plan ahead: Find out where the courthouse…
We’ve written extensively on the importance of using structured improvisation rather than scripting when speaking. With few exceptions, reading or recitation will not yield a persuasive, dynamic delivery. Structuring your order of topics and then improvising word-by-word helps your presentation come across as more natural. In essence, you train your brain to structure and remember your ideas in a specific order, but not with the precise words you will actually use. In our teaching, we…
It happened again last week, and it made me madder than usual. A whip-smart, socially skilled mid-level associate at a major law firm arrived at a communication coaching and confided that she had been taught not to gesture. In law school she had been instructed to speak by placing her hands straight down at her sides, or alternatively, clutching a lectern. Though this made her feel uncomfortable, she had persevered for several years, coping with…
Brian Johnson and I have been at several trial skills programs lately, both together and separately. Since we only teach for practitioners, not law students (I teach in one program at the University of Chicago Law School), we are always interested in how the programs are designed for today’s super-busy lawyers. What case files are used, and how long are they? What other reading is assigned? In other words, how much time are attorneys expected…