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Genevieve Carlton, Ph.D In the past two years, the EEOC has seen a 50% increase in monetary benefits recovered in sexual harassment claims. In January 2020, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission released statistics on sexual harassment allegations in 2019. Although the total number of allegations decreased slightly from 2018 to 2019, the monetary benefits recovered by the EEOC set a new record. In 2019, the EEOC recovered $68.2 million in monetary benefits for…
By Ainsley Brown Winner of the Working Now and Then Undergraduate Scholarship The social movement #MeToo has taken over the internet and media by storm. In October 2017, the #MeToo invited women and men to share detailed and horrifying stories of sexual harassment and assault that they experienced in various places and settings, including in their workplaces. Many of the stories relayed on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook under the hashtag #MeToo were stories from women…
Genevieve Carlton, Ph.D. As the cost of college continues to rise, many students struggle to cover the cost of tuition and other expenses. For undergraduates planning to attend law school, this can often mean taking out loans for their bachelor’s degree and their law degree. In response, Working Now and Then began offering the Working Now and Then Undergraduate Scholarship in 2019. The $1,000 scholarship supports a promising undergraduate student considering a career as a…
Genevieve Carlton, Ph.D. In May 2019, CNN announced that their freelancers must wait at least 90 days to receive payment for their work. Under the new “Net 90” plan, freelancers working for CNN will file an invoice and receive payment 90 days later. In New York City, this policy may violate the Freelance Isn’t Free Act, which guarantees timely payment for freelancers. WarnerMedia Vice President Brad Ingram informed freelancers of the change in a…
By Charles Joseph   Can you sue for wrongful termination in an at will state? If you’ve been fired, you may wonder whether you can file a lawsuit. In this blog post, I’ll explain how to sue for wrongful termination, even if you live in an at will state such as New York or New Jersey. What’s an at will state? In “at will employment” states, employers can fire employees without demonstrating a “just cause.”…
by Charles Joseph On August 6, 2019, New Jersey’s acting governor signed S1790 into law. The act includes stricter penalties for not paying wages and stronger protections for workers. What does the anti-wage theft law changes mean for workers in New Jersey? Wage theft, including minimum wage and overtime violations, costs American workers billions of dollars each year. Low-wage workers alone lose an estimated $50 billion a year because of wage theft. In 2015-2016, the…
Genevieve Carlton, Ph.D   Working Now and Then will award an undergraduate scholarship for the first time in December 2019. The Working Now and Then Undergraduate Scholarship will grant $1,000 to an undergraduate considering a career in employment law.  In 2019, Working Now and Then awarded its first scholarship, the Charles E. Joseph Employment Law Scholarship. Named for founder Charles Joseph, the scholarship supports law students planning to work as plaintiffs’ employment lawyers.  Winner…
What does the #MeToo Movement Mean for Employment Rights? By Jordan Kostelyk Law Students on Workers’ Rights Series The Law Students on Workers’ Rights series publishes essays from current and incoming students at some of the top law schools in the country. These essays, submitted for the Charles E. Joseph Employment Law Scholarship, address the question “What are the biggest challenges facing workers’ rights in the future?” The biggest future issue I foresee in…
By Gabren Webb Law Students on Workers’ Rights Series The Law Students on Workers’ Rights series publishes essays from current and incoming students at some of the top law schools in the country. These essays, submitted for the Charles E. Joseph Employment Law Scholarship, address the question “What are the biggest challenges facing workers’ rights in the future?” The notion that there is true equity in the United States of America holds no more…
by Charles Joseph On June 19, 2019, New York’s state legislature passed sweeping changes to the state’s employment laws. The updates include stronger protections against workplace discrimination and sexual harassment. What do these changes mean for workers in New York? The new law, expected to be signed by Governor Andrew Cuomo, significantly strengthens the state’s workplace protections. The changes dramatically update the New York State Human Rights Law (NYSHRL), expanding its legal safeguards and increasing…