Working: Now and Then

Resources for Workers and Those Who Care About Them

Latest from Working: Now and Then

Restaurant workers lose millions each year because of wage theft – but they can recover lost wages with the help of an employment lawyer. Genevieve Carlton, Ph.D Wage theft costs workers an estimated $50 billion a year according to the Economic Policy Institute. The restaurant industry withholds millions of dollars in wages from servers, bussers, hosts, bartenders, and other restaurant workers every year. But many forms of wage theft are difficult to identify or even…
EEOC data demonstrates a connection between sexual harassment and wages Genevieve Carlton, Ph.D Sexual harassment in the workplace remains a problem in every industry. From minimum wage workers to journalists and actresses making millions a year, millions of men and women face sexual harassment at work every year. Federal laws protect employees from workplace sexual harassment, which employees can report to the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission (EEOC). The EEOC issues reports on workplace sexual harassment…
Genevieve Carlton, Ph.D In 2019, Working Now and Then will offer the Charles E. Joseph Employment Law Scholarship for the first time. Named for Charles E. Joseph, founder of Working Now and Then, the annual scholarship offers $1,000 to a law student preparing for a career as a plaintiffs’ employment lawyer. Charles E. Joseph became an employment lawyer after graduating from NYU’s School of Law in 1990. For several years, Charles worked for a…
50% Increase in EEOC Sexual Harassment Recoveries Genevieve Carlton, Ph.D Sexual harassment in the workplace recently made headlines for a different reason: the EEOC reported a 50% increase in the number of sexual harassment cases filed, and a nearly 50% increase in the recovery amounts for victims of sexual harassment. In the first fiscal year since the #MeToo movement brought additional attention to workplace sexual harassment, more victims filed claims with the EEOC and more…
Workplace sexual harassment is a major problem, and local laws like the Stop Sexual Harassment in NYC Act are leading the fight Genevieve Carlton, Ph.D Workplace sexual harassment remains a major problem in 2018, even after decades of efforts to prevent and stop sexual harassment at work. On Last Week Tonight, John Oliver tackled the problem by looking back to the 1990s, a decade that vowed to end workplace sexual harassment. As Oliver noted, the…
A database on discrimination jury verdicts in New York reveals some surprising results Charles Joseph New York workers benefit from federal, state, and city laws that ban wage theft, discrimination, and sexual harassment in the workplace. These laws stop companies from denying minimum wage or overtime pay, and help workers facing wrongful termination or retaliation. However, how many employment discrimination lawsuits end in jury verdict for the worker? A recent study…
FLSA wage protections also apply to immigrants and undocumented workers Genevieve Carlton, Ph.D The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) provides critical federal protections against wage theft by employers. Workers who are paid less than minimum wage or denied overtime pay can receive back pay and penalties under the FLSA by filing a claim with the Wage and Hour Division (WHD) of the U.S. Department of Labor. These provisions do not just apply to U.S. workers,…
The patchwork case law on sexual orientation discrimination poses major challenges for LGBTQ employees Genevieve Carlton, Ph.D Laws protect workers from racial discrimination in the workplace, unequal pay for equal work based on gender, and discrimination because of an employee’s religion. Under these laws, victims of discrimination can file a claim for wrongful termination, unequal pay, or a hostile work environment. But what about discrimination because of sexual orientation? LGBTQ discrimination remains legal in…