Lawline

Summer is almost upon us! It’s finally time to get outside, relax on the beach, and brush up on grilling recipes. But for many attorneys in Illinois, it’s also time to buckle down and finish the biennial MCLE requirement. Illinois attorneys with last names N through Z have to complete 30 MCLE credits by June 30 in odd-numbered years (A through M are due in even-numbered years, so they don’t need to report until 2020).…
Happy Pride! We are four years out from Obergefell legalizing same-sex marriage, so clearly all  legal issues for LGBTQ families have been resolved, right? Just kidding! As attorneys who specialize in LGBTQ issues are aware, federal recognition of same-sex marriage does not always translate into protection at the state level. If your clients are living in a state where same-sex parents are recognized on a birth certificate, that’s great. But that same couple on vacation…
A director or officer being sued or investigated for allegations of mismanagement is facing one of his or her worst nightmares. His reputation is at stake (often fueled by a stream of adverse news articles in the local press) and, because a director’s or officer’s liability even for ‘corporate decisions’ is a personal liability, such a claim can be a financial nightmare as well. The situation is made all the worse when the director receives…
Lawyering ain’t easy. Law school teaches students how read cases and employ the IRAC method when writing an exam. Many law students even gain practical, hands-on experience through clinical education. But upon graduating and passing the bar exam, there’s still so much left to learn about how to actually practice law. That’s why continuing legal education is mandatory for every attorney, and is often particularly arduous for newly admitted attorneys. The good thing is that…
The American Lawyer’s 2019 Diversity Scorecard has been released, and while it’s not all bad, it also isn’t pretty.  The 2019 Scorecard recorded the average number of full-time-equivalent (FTE) minority (including Asian-American, African-American, Latino, Hispanic, Native American and “self-described multiracial”) attorneys at Am Law 200 and National Law Journal 250 law firms for the 2018 calendar year.  Here are the key takeaways you need to know about this year’s analysis: How it Works. The Scorecard…
Summer is around the corner and the school year is coming to a close but, at Lawline, the learning never stops. With topics ranging from e-sports to social media marketing, Lawline has a great lineup of programs coming your way in June. Don’t worry if you can’t make a live webcast – all of our courses go on demand within 48 hours after airing (and you can check them out with our free trial)!…
Meredith Cohen is Lawline’s Director of Customer Experience. She manages relationships with state regulating agencies nationwide to bring the best and most relevant content to attorneys who need it. In this monthly column, she answers customers’ most pressing CLE questions. Dear Meredith, The deadline for Kentucky is coming up, and I heard something about not needing to do live credits anymore. Is that true? What do I need to do for June? Signed Clueless in…
As new platforms for disseminating information proliferate, it can be difficult to know exactly what news is reliable and what is “fake news.” As the 2020 election cycle ramps up, being able to spot questionable sources is critical, especially for attorneys. In his program A Perfect Storm: The Intersection of Fake News, Celebrity Endorsements, and Social Media, attorney Joseph Rosenbaum discusses some of the key elements to analyze when examining a piece of…
In the latest Faculty Spotlight, Julie Ebenstein of the ACLU discusses her journey to impact litigation and her thoughts on voting rights. A senior staff attorney with the ACLU Voting Rights Project, Julie has litigated voting rights matters around the country, including cases in North Carolina that successfully challenged an omnibus voter suppression law. Following her Columbia undergrad and J.D. at Fordham Law, Julie focused on refugee protection issues, working on the Thailand-Myanmar border with…
In 1996, California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana. Over the next 20 years, 28 states and the District of Columbia legalized medical marijuana, and nine states (plus D.C.) legalized recreational marijuana. During those 20 years, marijuana legalization had little impact on the workplace. Employers could continue their zero-tolerance drug policies with few repercussions. For example, state courts in California, Colorado, and Washington all found against plaintiff-employees who claimed they could not be…