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Is a tidy illustration of the ongoing failure of the courts and the legal profession to properly do their jobs. It’s also – and always was – more than a little ironic to place a law requiring secrecy of stasi police officer records in the chapter dubbed “civil rights law”. One would think this was not in the least complicated, because in fact it is not complicated. There is a constitutional right to confront the…
that comes up after reviewing these numbers is: Has there been a change in the last decade or so? Our BJS statistics date from about 2006, and as we wrote just a few days ago tell an entirely fictional tale where law enforcement in the United States is basically perfect when it comes to committing actionable constitutional violations, because the rate is roughly .25% calculated based on those statistics. From that standpoint, the entirely independent…
Relevant statistics are not kept. Why should we? That would only help the rabble. But sometimes you can put two and two together from different sources. Most of the time it’s not very good information – and that’s true of what we are about to note here – but then again it’s some indication. Better than nothing, we think. So the NYPD has an annual budget considerably north of $900 million, and we’ll just round…
Yes, we should really flesh out the numbers a bit more. It’s hard to convey just how dramatic they are. It’s like they defy description, pointing to a situation that is breathtakingly disingenuous when it isn’t simply incoherent. So the system’s statistical verdict is that actionable constitutional violations occur only .25% of the time in day to day law enforcement. What does that actually mean? If you got a grade in a course you took…
Civil unrest, as in “rioting”, is a breakdown of the rule of law. This is a theme we have returned to a number of times here at LoS. We return to it today for obvious reasons. The officer starring in the viral video – Derek Chauvin – shown with his leg on the neck of George Floyd – killing him – has now been charged with murder. That is to say, in a period…
It’s been almost nine years since Casey Anthony’s “wrongful acquittal”.  The partisans are still so ginned up that when she gets a speeding ticket it’s national news. Why does she still live in Florida?  Or in the United States at all?  She probably doesn’t have the money to move away.  Our advice at the time still holds, though.  Obviously. We did a lot of posting about Ms. Anthony back in the day.  Such as
Well, we wish things had been cleared up a bit by now. But of course we don’t run things at the SCOTUS. Or anywhere else, for that matter. Or even our own life, it often seems. Anyway, as our regular readers (all three of them!) are no doubt aware, we have been following a few cases in the SCOTUS that might, or might not, have something to do with an important issue the SCOTUS should…
Linda is taking note of the same case on which we offered our opinion, but she thinks Kavanaugh is doing the opposite of what we think Kavanaugh is doing. We can’t both be right.  Eventually we’ll see who’s who or what’s what, as the case may be. But there is much, much more going on with the SCOTUS, and we’re interested in this whole “overturn precedent” issue for reasons of our own having nothing…
We still lean libertarian here at LoS.  Lean. Because ultimately the dream of a world without government is utopian and silly.  The same actually applies to “democracy”, which is why we figure – in the end – monarchy.  But that’s a long discussion. No, this morning we are simply pondering the whole coronavirus thing, and how it all pans out in the longer term.  What have we learned?  Indeed, what have we done? There is…
At this point, it’s a matter of vote counting.  And, looking at the Ramos v. Louisiana opinions, which we just reviewed.  Our judgment that Ramos represented a sign of hope may have been premature. Ramos is about two things.  The first and foremost is….stare decisis.  Ramos overruled a previous SCOTUS decision, Apodaca v. Oregon. For present purposes it doesn’t matter what either case was about or what the cases held.  What is important are…