Wake Forest University School of Law

The formal study of law has been part of Wake Forest since 1894. Over the years, Wake Forest has evolved as a small Baptist college for men located just north of Raleigh, North Carolina, to an independent, multi-dimensional, nationally recognized university located in Winston-Salem. Wake Forest Law has grown along with and at times led the development of the institution of which it is a part. The law school, which has worked to meet the needs of a changing legal profession as well as the changing needs of students, continues to be a leader in legal education by modeling engagement and professionalism through academic excellence and a thorough commitment to service.

Wake Forest University School of Law Blogs

Latest from Wake Forest University School of Law

By: Benjamin Suslavich One year ago, the Wake Forest Journal of Business & Intellectual Property Law addressed the prospect of compulsory licensing under the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS Agreement). The TRIPS Agreement is an international treaty that came into effect in 1995 and sets out minimum standards of intellectual property (“IP”) protection each signatory country must uphold. Later that same year, on Oct. 2, 2020, India and South Africa proposed…
By: Lashania White Data privacy concerns have undoubtedly spiked during the pandemic due to new categories of identifiable personal data being collected from employees. Given this rise in accumulated personal information, data privacy law has the potential to be implicated, owing to the collection and disclosure of employees’ confidential personal information. Due to COVID-19, many employers gathered and collected personal employee data as it relates to managing the risks from the pandemic. Accordingly, employers…
By: Benjamin Suslavich In a split 5-4 decision in Arthrex Inc. v. Smith & Nephew, Inc, the Supreme Court determined that the structure of Administrative Patent Judge (“APJs”) appointments—or lack thereof—was unconstitutional and took it upon itself to restructure the Patent Office’s chain of command. This case is another example of the Court striving to preserve the inter partes review (IPR) system, which allows anyone to file a petition requesting that the Patent Office cancel…
By: Jonathon Ballantyne It was the tweet heard ‘round the fast food world. After quietly launching its own version of the chicken sandwich, Popeyes broadsided rival Chick-fil-A on Twitter in what turned out to be the opening salvo in a new high-stakes conflict—the chicken sandwich wars. Within two weeks of launching the new item, Popeyes sold 1,000 chicken sandwiches per store a day. Popeyes also saw its store traffic double and its store sales jump…
By: Joey Johnson COVID-19 turned the world on its head. As the world came to a screeching halt, healthcare providers and essential businesses were tasked with maintaining function while protecting patients, employees, and customers amidst a rapidly changing health and technological landscape. Telemedicine quickly emerged as a tool to connect patients and healthcare providers without the risks of in-person interaction. Telemedicine is the use of telecommunications to deliver medical care to patients from a distance.…
By: Noelle Henry Bitcoin took the world by storm in 2009 as a peer-to-peer cash system. Over time, this system evolved and attracted investors who saw bitcoin as a “store-of-value currency, comparable to gold.”  Today, the excitement surrounding cryptocurrency has grown to such an extent that some employers are paying their employees with cryptocurrencies and certain businesses are accepting cryptocurrency as payment. Cryptocurrency has benefits like cost-effective transfers that have attracted many…
By: Charles Jenkins Special Purpose Acquisition Companies (“SPACs”) have become one of Wall Street’s most favored investment vehicles. In the first half of 2021, there has already been an unprecedented number of SPACs formed. These investment vehicles offer private companies a faster way to go public by avoiding the lengthy and cumbersome process of a traditional initial public offering (“IPO”). Well-known companies that have been taken public by SPACs include the online sports betting platform…
By: Carli Berasi A conversation regarding patent rights has entered the international pharmaceutical stage as the World Trade Organization has debated requiring a temporary waiver of patent protections granted to companies for their COVID-19 vaccines. Patent waivers temporarily suspend protection for a creation, allowing others the opportunity to utilize the patented subject matter without fear of “being sanctioned or fined.” The federal government holds the right to administer legal protection to unique inventions that are a…
By: Hannah Norem After a year-long delay, the 2020—now 2021—Tokyo Olympic Games will begin July 23. However, these Games are incredibly unpopular in Japan, the host nation, and raise public health questions around the world. COVID-19 is still ravaging many parts of the world, and some are concerned about the safety of bringing thousands of athletes together and then sending them back to their home countries. The insistence to continue the Olympic Games, despite thousands
By: Michaela Cappucci The commercial use of personal data—accumulated via digital streams, online searches and applications that capture an individual’s musical tastes and listening habits—drives the way music is commoditized, consumed and promoted. This data is used by (1) record labels to determine which artists to sign and which to drop, (2) music streaming services to deliver content to listeners, and (3) concert promoters to route artists’ concert tours. Music is…