Wake Forest University School of Law

The formal study of law has been part of Wake Forest since 1894. Over the years, Wake Forest has evolved as a small Baptist college for men located just north of Raleigh, North Carolina, to an independent, multi-dimensional, nationally recognized university located in Winston-Salem. Wake Forest Law has grown along with and at times led the development of the institution of which it is a part. The law school, which has worked to meet the needs of a changing legal profession as well as the changing needs of students, continues to be a leader in legal education by modeling engagement and professionalism through academic excellence and a thorough commitment to service.

Wake Forest University School of Law Blogs

Latest from Wake Forest University School of Law

By: Katherine Brock  Nearly eight years ago, fast food employees in Seattle marched out of work and into the streets, launching a strike—and ultimately a movement—for a $15 minimum wage. Within two months, the strike spread to more than fifty cities across the country, forcing many restaurants to close temporarily amid cries for higher wages and the right to organize. Today, Seattle residents enjoy a minimum wage between $15 and $16.69 an hour depending on…
By: Evan Federico In August of 2020, Citigroup Inc. inadvertently wired almost $900 million to a group of hedge funds to pay off a syndicated loan for the struggling multinational cosmetics company Revlon, Inc. However, the money had come from Citigroup–not Revlon–and neither Revlon nor Citigroup intended to pay the loan off. Citigroup was merely the administrative agent for the loan, meant to collect and distribute interest payments, manage amortization schedules, and provide other…
By: Katherine Brock  At the start of the twentieth century, five men founded the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company for the purpose of mining for corundum, an extremely hard and versatile mineral ideal for making sandpaper and grinding wheels. The company failed, however, discovering only a low-grade, inferior mineral called anorthosite. Today, with corporate operations in seventy countries and sales in two hundred countries, the same company is a household name across several industries
By: Britteny Junious Sugar has been a hot topic discussion among the sugar industry and its advocates, food regulatory officials, and dieticians for decades. The most prominent reason has been America’s struggle with controlling obesity rates and diabetes. It has been argued that to help control obesity, we must limit our daily intake of added sugars. The most recent 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggests that Americans’ consumption of calories from added sugar should account…
By: Mona Ibadi  Since its inception over ten years ago, Bitcoin has been the focus of countless investors across the world. The unique nature of Bitcoin is that it does not require an intermediary such as a financial institution. Instead, users can access, buy, and send currency on an individual basis. The desire to make transactions without the centralization of money through a bank partially stems from a distrust of such institutions and the need…
By: Evan Federico The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC” or “the Commission”) will play a crucial role in President Joe Biden’s ambitious plans to tackle climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the power generation sector. FERC is an independent agency that regulates the interstate transmission of electricity, natural gas, and oil. Biden has already named Democratic Commissioner Richard Glick Chairman of FERC. Once Republican Commissioner Neil Chatterjee’s term expires in June of 2021,…
By: Kyle Tatich Dan Lust is an attorney in the New York City Office of Geragos & Geragos. After working for the New York Giants in their PR Department, Dan went on to Fordham Law School where he split his focus between Trial Advocacy and Sports Law. Dan parlays his sports-specific background to his litigation practice, where he represents a wide range of businesses and individuals in matters across the firm’s footprint.  He presently serves…
By: Mona Ibadi The United States spends billions of dollars making revolutionary strides in technological research every year. Businesses, big and small, are expending resources to provide up-to-date, innovative products to effectively compete in the market. Although technological development is rapidly growing, the concern for intellectual property theft remains an issue. Despite a lack of public concern, economic espionage from America’s leading culprit – the Chinese government – has increased by 1,300% in the past…
By: R. Daniel Johnson As the business world continues to evolve, one increasingly important aspect of business success is the online reviews left by customers. Customer satisfaction has always been a main priority for small and large businesses, but when does the old saying that “the customer is always right” go too far? With the advance of technology, the availability of public comment on business performance is at an all-time high. While this new access…
By: Kyle Tatich Future historians and scholars will not lack substance when writing about 2020: the year dominated by the COVID-19 pandemic, a wave of protests against racial injustice, and a complete alteration to the American way of life. Similarly, in the realm of collegiate athletics, the year 2020 will amount to a significance of equal magnitude as it epitomized the most transformative year in the 114-year history of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (“NCAA”).…