Wake Forest University School of Law

The formal study of law has been part of Wake Forest since 1894. Over the years, Wake Forest has evolved as a small Baptist college for men located just north of Raleigh, North Carolina, to an independent, multi-dimensional, nationally recognized university located in Winston-Salem. Wake Forest Law has grown along with and at times led the development of the institution of which it is a part. The law school, which has worked to meet the needs of a changing legal profession as well as the changing needs of students, continues to be a leader in legal education by modeling engagement and professionalism through academic excellence and a thorough commitment to service.

Wake Forest University School of Law Blogs

Latest from Wake Forest University School of Law

By: Haodi Dong Wikimedia Commons In 2002, Congress passed the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (“SOX”), setting a series of new regulations and penalties for all U.S. public companies. SOX aimed to protect investors from fraudulent financial activities by requiring companies to certify the accuracy of their financial information. Specifically, Title I of SOX established the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (“PCAOB”) under the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). The PCAOB “oversee[s] the audit of public…
By: Ashley Willard https://pixabay.com/photos/stadium-rows-of-seats-grandstand-2921657/ In March, after a long year of negotiations with the NFL, the NFL Players Association (“NFLPA”) ratified the 2020 Collective Bargaining Agreement (“CBA”), which governs through 2030. Neither side could have anticipated that a pandemic would ravage the country and potentially bring them back to the bargaining table just months later. Since the NFL does not have a “force majeure” clause in its CBA that could terminate the season,…
By: Kyle Tatich https://pixabay.com/photos/football-american-college-83513/ When it comes to the decisions to suspend, amend, or fully continue fall sports in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the echoes of history are too loud for the NCAA and its member schools to ignore. Those who advocate for games to happen are not only tossing aside the final vestiges of the NCAA’s founding purpose—enhancing the safety of college sports—but also possibly tearing down many protections collegiate athletics…
By: Hannah Weiss http://www.nlrb.gov/nlrb/legal/manuals/CHM1/2009/CHM1.pdf   Unionization is declining. A recent report from the Brookings Institute demonstrates that membership in US labor unions has declined since the middle of the twentieth century.  Union membership was at its highest in the 1940s and 1950s when almost thirty-five percent of workers belonged to unions.  Unionization has declined most in the private sector, with only a little over six percent of private-sector workers belonging to unions in 2018.  In…
By: Hannah Weiss TikTok.com   US officials are conducting a national security review of TikTok, a popular app that allows users to share short videos and video clips.  This is part of a growing trend of high-profile transactions being reviewed for national security conflicts as foreign companies seeking to invest in the United States are facing increasing scrutiny.   Evincing this, in 2018, President Trump signed off on the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act (FIRRMA). The…
By: Nathaniel Reiff What may seem as a virtuous undertaking by the U.S. Securities Exchange Commission (“SEC”) to protect the nation’s aging population, is receiving a significant amount of backlash from some of the nation’s most influential advocacy groups. In response to the outcry that profit-driven advice from financial advisers and brokers cause government officials and retail investors to lose as much as $17 billion a year,  the SEC adopted a new standard of…
By: Hannah Weiss The Supreme Court recently granted certiorari to determine whether US courts, under their equitable powers, can require people convicted of securities law violations to disgorge their ill-gotten profits.  The answer to this question could have a significant effect on the Security and Exchange Commission’s (SEC’s) mechanisms for enforcing securities laws.  The question is the central issue in Liu v. SEC and has remained unanswered since the Court’s 2017 ruling in Kokesh v. SEC. In Kokesh, the…
By: Nathaniel Reiff On February 28, 2020, the Wake Forest Journal of  Business & Intellectual Property will have the privilege of hosting Dr. Todd Hairston as a speaker at its Spring Symposium: “Amateur Hour is Over: Analyzing the Impact Changes in ‘Amateurism’ May Have on the Business of Collegiate Sports.” Dr. Hairston will be part of a panel alongside Professors Mason Ashe of the Wharton Business School and Howard University School of Law and…
By: Nathaniel Reiff On February 28, 2020, the Wake Forest Journal of  Business & Intellectual Property will have the privilege of hosting attorney Jason Setchen as a speaker at its Spring Symposium: “Amateur Hour is Over: Analyzing the Impact Changes in ‘Amateurism’ May Have on the Business of Collegiate Sports.” Mr. Setchen will be part of a panel alongside Wigdor LLP partner Michael Willemin, to analyze whether a pay-for-play model is legally practical…
By: Nathaniel Reiff The “eternal conflict” of athletic departments fostering a for-profit business model while adhering to the nonprofit educational mission of the NCAA and its umbrella of public universities has captured the interest of both federal and state lawmakers. Up to 30 states are considering proposals that would lay the foundation for student-athlete compensation. This initiative comes after California passed a law in 2019 that would allow NCAA players in the state to make endorsements…