Journal of Business & Intellectual Property Law

The JBIPL Blog offers a forum for our Editors and Staff to expand our coverage of developments in both business and IP law. The Blog will provide short entries analyzing current cases, trends and issues in business and IP law. The Blog has won the The Expert Institute's 2015 and 2016 Best Legal Blog Contest for Education and Law School Blogs.

Latest from Journal of Business & Intellectual Property Law

By: Carli Berasi A conversation regarding patent rights has entered the international pharmaceutical stage as the World Trade Organization has debated requiring a temporary waiver of patent protections granted to companies for their COVID-19 vaccines. Patent waivers temporarily suspend protection for a creation, allowing others the opportunity to utilize the patented subject matter without fear of “being sanctioned or fined.” The federal government holds the right to administer legal protection to unique inventions that are a…
By: Hannah Norem After a year-long delay, the 2020—now 2021—Tokyo Olympic Games will begin July 23. However, these Games are incredibly unpopular in Japan, the host nation, and raise public health questions around the world. COVID-19 is still ravaging many parts of the world, and some are concerned about the safety of bringing thousands of athletes together and then sending them back to their home countries. The insistence to continue the Olympic Games, despite thousands
By: Michaela Cappucci The commercial use of personal data—accumulated via digital streams, online searches and applications that capture an individual’s musical tastes and listening habits—drives the way music is commoditized, consumed and promoted. This data is used by (1) record labels to determine which artists to sign and which to drop, (2) music streaming services to deliver content to listeners, and (3) concert promoters to route artists’ concert tours. Music is…
By: Haodi Dong Recently, a growing number of companies are choosing to go public by merging with Special Purpose Acquisition Companies (“SPACs”) instead of going through a traditional Initial Public Offerings (“IPOs”). This post discusses current SPAC regulations and explores why investors should think carefully before investing in SPACs. The Year of SPAC In 2020, 248 SPAC IPOs raised over $82 billion, which accounted for 55% of total U.S. IPOs and 46% of total…
By: Joshua Durham  Wyoming’s so-called “slack-jawed” Decentralized Autonomous Organizations “(DAO”) Supplement bill will take effect July 2021. It grants DAOs the opportunity to register as limited liability companies (“LLCs”) in the state. This bill is fitting for the “Cowboy State,” not only because its nickname evinces the “wild west” ethos around the emerging cryptoverse, but also because Wyoming first pioneered the LLC, a once novel business organization. Perhaps even more fitting for this…
By: Katherine Brock  Nearly eight years ago, fast food employees in Seattle marched out of work and into the streets, launching a strike—and ultimately a movement—for a $15 minimum wage. Within two months, the strike spread to more than fifty cities across the country, forcing many restaurants to close temporarily amid cries for higher wages and the right to organize. Today, Seattle residents enjoy a minimum wage between $15 and $16.69 an hour depending on…
By: Evan Federico In August of 2020, Citigroup Inc. inadvertently wired almost $900 million to a group of hedge funds to pay off a syndicated loan for the struggling multinational cosmetics company Revlon, Inc. However, the money had come from Citigroup–not Revlon–and neither Revlon nor Citigroup intended to pay the loan off. Citigroup was merely the administrative agent for the loan, meant to collect and distribute interest payments, manage amortization schedules, and provide other…
By: Katherine Brock  At the start of the twentieth century, five men founded the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company for the purpose of mining for corundum, an extremely hard and versatile mineral ideal for making sandpaper and grinding wheels. The company failed, however, discovering only a low-grade, inferior mineral called anorthosite. Today, with corporate operations in seventy countries and sales in two hundred countries, the same company is a household name across several industries
By: Britteny Junious Sugar has been a hot topic discussion among the sugar industry and its advocates, food regulatory officials, and dieticians for decades. The most prominent reason has been America’s struggle with controlling obesity rates and diabetes. It has been argued that to help control obesity, we must limit our daily intake of added sugars. The most recent 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggests that Americans’ consumption of calories from added sugar should account…
By: Mona Ibadi  Since its inception over ten years ago, Bitcoin has been the focus of countless investors across the world. The unique nature of Bitcoin is that it does not require an intermediary such as a financial institution. Instead, users can access, buy, and send currency on an individual basis. The desire to make transactions without the centralization of money through a bank partially stems from a distrust of such institutions and the need…