Privacy & Data Security

California Legislature Working Feverishly To Avert Privacy Ballot Initiative We have previously reported a ballot initiative known as the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (“CCPA”), that is expected to be on the November ballot.  If passed, it would make sweeping changes to consumer privacy protection rights for Californians, likely creating a new national standard.  View Full Post
In a decision that defines how the Fourth Amendment applies to information collected in the digital age, the Supreme Court today held that police must use a warrant to obtain from a cell phone company records that detail the location and movements of a cell phone user.  View Full Post
On June 21, 2018, California lawmakers introduced AB 375, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (the “Bill”). If enacted and signed by the Governor by June 28, 2018, the Bill would introduce key privacy requirements for businesses, but would also result in the removal of a ballot initiative of the same name from the November 6, 2018, statewide ballot. View Full Post
On June 22, 2018, the United States Supreme Court held in Carpenter v. United States that law enforcement agencies must obtain a warrant supported by probable cause to obtain historical cell-site location information (“CSLI”) from third-party providers. The government argued in Carpenter that it could access historical CSLI through a court order alone under the Stored Communications Act (the “SCA”). View Full Post
The FTC recently settled with the mobile phone company BLU Products, Inc., over allegations that the company was letting one of its vendors pull extensive and detailed personal information off of users’ phones. According to the FTC, BLU phones were pre-loaded with firmware updating tools made by ADUPS Technology. View Full Post
The Los Angeles Times has reported that the California Legislature and the activists behind the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 have reached a tentative deal for the withdrawal of the privacy measure primed for the November ballot. In exchange for the withdrawal of the Ballot Initiative, Democrats in the … View Full Post
Five Things to Know About Smart Contracts Computer scientist and legal scholar Nick Szabo first proposed the idea of “smart contracts” in 1996. Szabo published his initial paper on the topic in a publication called Extropy, a journal of transhumanism, a movement seeking to enhance human intellect and physiology by means of sophisticated technologies. View Full Post