Illinois Supreme Court Review

Understanding Appellate Decision Making

Latest from Illinois Supreme Court Review

Yesterday, we began our review of how the Court’s unanimity rate has changed over time with a review of the data for the civil docket.  Today, we’re looking at the criminal docket.  For the entire twenty-eight years, the Court has decided 1,540 cases and been unanimous in 67.86% – less than a point higher than the overall unanimity rate. For the first four years of the period, the unanimity rate was over the average: 79,.71%…
This week, we’re turning our attention to a new issue, comparing the evolution of the Court’s unanimity rate in civil and criminal cases over time.  Between 1990 and 2017, the Court decided 1,363 civil cases, 67.06% of them unanimously. In Table 890, we report the yearly numbers from 1990 to 1996.  In 1990, the Court’s civil unanimity rate was 64.04%.  In 1991, it was 75.47%.  In 1992, it was 67.39%.  In 1993, it was 63.16%. …
Yesterday, we began a multi-day crossover post comparing the Illinois and California Supreme Courts’ civil (and later in the week, criminal) dockets, how they compare to each other and how they evolved over time. Today, we’re comparing the Courts’ dockets from 2004 to 2017. We showed last time that the Illinois Supreme Court decided 139 more cases from 1990 to 1996 than the California Supreme Court did. By the 2004 to 2010 period, that distribution…
After reading this shout-out to our ongoing series of posts, both here and at the California Supreme Court Review, tracing how the courts’ civil and criminal dockets have evolved over time, I thought it was time for another cross-over series, both here and at CSCR. So, today and tomorrow, we’re looking at the two courts’ civil dockets: (1) year by year totals for each area of law, both for the Illinois and California Supreme…
Yesterday, we took a close look at the Court’s arbitration cases since 1990.  Today, we’re on the criminal side of the docket, looking at the Court’s cases involving property crimes.  Less than a third of the Court’s property crime cases were won by the prosecution below – only 31.58%.  Oddly, the Court reversed 83.33% of the prosecution wins it reviewed – admittedly, in a small sample. We chart both prosecution wins affirmed and reversed in…
Last week, we turned our attention to two new two areas of law in our ongoing review of the Court’s decision making – on the civil side, arbitration cases, and on the criminal side, cases involving property crimes.  Today, we’re taking a more in-depth look at the Court’s arbitration decisions. Since 1990, a lopsided proportion of the arbitration cases the Court has opted to hear were won by the plaintiffs below – 68.75% of the…
Last time, we reviewed the Court’s experience with arbitration law cases since 1990.  Now we’re reviewing the Court’s decisions involving property crimes (burglary, forgery, etc.)  Since 1990, the Court has decided nineteen cases involving property crime issues. The Court decided two cases in 1990, one in 1991 and three in 1992. The Court decided one property crime case in 1999 and two in 2000. The Court decided two cases in 2007, one in 2008 and…
This week, we’re turning our attention to two new areas of law in the Court’s civil and criminal dockets: arbitration law and cases involving property crimes.  Since 1990, the Court has decided seventeen cases involving arbitration law. The Court decided one arbitration case in 1991, two in 1992 and one in 1995. The Court decided one arbitration case in 1997, three in 1998 and one in 2001. The Court decided two arbitration cases in 2004…
Last week, we reviewed the year-by-year numbers for the Illinois Supreme Court’s history with two new areas of the law: civil cases involving employment law and criminal cases involving sexual offenses. Today, we’re taking a closer look at the sexual offense cases. Since 1990, fifty-five percent of the criminal sexual offense cases which the Court has agreed to review were won by the prosecution at the Appellate Court. Not surprisingly, reversals of those prosecution wins…
Last week, we reviewed the Supreme Court’s docket in two new areas of law: employment on the civil side and cases involving sexual offenses on the criminal side.  This week, we’re taking a deeper look at both areas of law. In employment law, the Court’s docket has been evenly split between cases won by the employer and the employee below – sixteen of each.  The Court has reversed employers’ wins from the Appellate Court at…