@theBar

The @theBar blog is an online publication of the Chicago Bar Association’s Young Lawyers Section (YLS).  On May 16, 2018, the YLS Executive Council approved the creation of the @theBar blog as a project of the YLS Journal. The @theBar blog strives to promote the YLS’s dedication to professional development, ethical practice, the service of our profession, and the well-being of our members.

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Fall is here, and so is the September/October 2020 issue of the CBA Record online! Click here to read it now! Featured YLS Journal articles include: A New Way to Define Winning, by Jeffrey Moskowitz Celebrating the Life of Past YLS Chair Judge Dorothy Kirie Kinnaird, by Kenneth Matuszewski Easing the Path Toward an Involuntary Law Firm Break-Up, by John C. Sciaccotta and Benjamin E. Haskin The CBA Record is a multifaceted journal published six…
Post Authored by: Brian M. Bentrup There is virtually no aspect of ordinary life that COVID-19 has not affected in some way. In order to provide much needed relief, Congress enacted the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act in March 2020. Both were signed into law by President Donald J. Trump. The FFCRA and the CARES Act included 120-day federal eviction moratorium for renters who…
Post Authored By: Laura Wibberley The Honorable Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was only the second woman to serve on The United States Supreme Court since she assumed her position in August 1993. Justice Ginsburg often joined in the majority opinions in each of her terms. Though, she was known for her celebrated and magnetic dissents. Justice Ginsburg would wear her sparkling dissent collar as part of her wardrobe when announcing her dissent from the majority…
Post Authored by Ted Kontopoulos and Kenny Matuszewski More than ever, people are aware of the long-lasting effects of racial injustice on everyone and how it permeates from the past into the present. With this knowledge and awareness, each person can choose how to respond to these injustices. Particularly, the choices members of the legal profession make, no matter how ordinary or intentional, directly contribute to racial justice. The Young Lawyers Section (“YLS”) and Racial…
Post by Laura Wibberley The Young Lawyers Section (“YLS”) of the Chicago Bar Association celebrates fifty years of service and dedication to the Chicago legal industry. The YLS was created in July 1971. Even from its inception, members were committed to benefiting and serving our local community and profession. The YLS committees vastly contributed to the legal landscape. In the 1970s, YLS legal assistance programs included the legal aid services for Juvenile Court Respondents, families…
Post Authored by Natalie Elizaroff Amidst a global pandemic and social distancing concerns due to Covid-19, more and more individuals are going online. Videoconferencing software such as Zoom and WebEx have become household names for businesses, educators, and even government officials. [1] As the demand for alternative software increases, Virtual Reality (VR) may emerge as a mainstream solution. VR allows users to immerse themselves and interact with a 3D virtual environment by using a head-mounted…
In more than one way this year, we as citizens of the United States can make our voices heard and accounted for. You may have already filled out the Census this year, but there’s one more civic duty to do: VOTE! But what do you need to do in order to vote in Illinois? Check out the video or the informational post below to learn more: Publice Service Announcement brought to you by the Young…
By Michelle Parthum, Benjamin Woodring, and Elizabeth Clarke In-house lawyers spend their days in near-constant communication with business colleagues, counterparties at other organizations, outside counsel, and many others.  Many of those communications involve sensitive, confidential information—including information that may be protected by the attorney-client privilege, attorney work product doctrine, and related doctrines. The battles over whether such communications are properly protected under such doctrines are typically fought by outside counsel in the context of active…
Post Authored by Teresa M. Dettloff Restrictive covenants, or covenants not to compete, are common in physician-hospital contracts for employment. When a dispute about whether a restrictive covenant should bind a physician who has left employment at the hospital arises, the first step for a court, before considering the terms of a restrictive covenant, is to determine 1) whether the restrictive covenant is ancillary to a valid contract; and 2) whether the restrictive covenant is…