@theBar

The @theBar blog is an online publication of the Chicago Bar Association’s Young Lawyers Section (YLS).  On May 16, 2018, the YLS Executive Council approved the creation of the @theBar blog as a project of the YLS Journal. The @theBar blog strives to promote the YLS’s dedication to professional development, ethical practice, the service of our profession, and the well-being of our members.

Post Authored by Brian M. Bentrup The legal world is currently grappling with how much of the practice of law can be done virtually, how much needs to be done in person, and how much can be placed on hold indefinitely. There is an immediacy associated with guardianships meaning petitions cannot wait indefinitely and certain aspects of the process can only be done in person. Furthermore, some petitions are filed on an emergency basis, which…
Post Authored by Kasim Carbide While it began its journey as an obscure financial technology, in a little over a decade, Bitcoin has revolutionized financial technology and security, while capturing global headlines.[i] Although the price of Bitcoin is extremely volatile day-to-day, the virtual currency has held onto most of the value it has gained over the years. As Bitcoin becomes more widely adopted by customers and businesses, it has already begun to make its…
Interviewed by Kenny Matuszewski Now celebrating its 20th Anniversary, the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin’s 40 Under Forty recognizes rising stars in the legal community. Past winners come from all practice areas and settings, including the government, private practice, and in-house. The one thing they all share is their commitment to excellence and dedication to the legal profession. Judge LaShonda A. Hunt, United States Bankruptcy Judge in the Northern District of Illinois, has spent most of…
Post Authored By Laura Wibberley Now that vaccines designed to protect against the virus that causes COVID-19 have entered clinical trial stages, the question now posed is, can the government mandate that the public receive the vaccine? The classic case of Jacobson v. Massachusetts, posed the question in the context of a state law that required adult citizens to obtain the small pox vaccination or face a fine. 197 U.S. 11 (1905). The United State…
Post Authored by Brian Bentrup On June 15, 2020, the United States Supreme Court issued a landmark decision in Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia that protected transgendered individuals from workplace discrimination. This has brought the rights of transgendered individuals and, more broadly, rights of the LGBTQIA+ community to the forefront of the national consciousness. This article examines some of the issues facing transgendered individuals. For the purposes of this article, the term “transgender” applies to…
Post Authored By: Stephanie Nikitenko Earlier during the pandemic, I discussed the impact of COVID-19 on law students regarding classes and graduation, and I briefly touched on the topic of the bar exam. However, since the bar exam has been so immensely impacted, I believed it merited additional attention. I am only sitting for the bar exam in Illinois, but every state and every bar examinee has been impacted by this in some way, and…
Post Authored by Jason A. Pica II What is life without divorce? It’s a question I will never be able to answer. My parents divorced around my first birthday. This wouldn’t be the first time either of my parents divorced since my biological father divorced his second wife six years before my mom divorced my stepfather. But I was always at the center of these divorces. As a child, I thought I caused my parents’…
Interviewed by Kenny Matuszewski Kenny: Where do you work? Christian: I work at the Law Office of Christian Blume. Recently, I developed an assumed name for my firm called Blume Law, for branding and marketing purposes. I have no employees and have been on my own since October 2018. Kenny: What do you practice? Christian: I practice real estate law, business transactions, and some litigation. However, I keep litigation to a minimum.  My real estate…
Post authored by Teresa Detloff Prior to transitioning to medical malpractice defense work, I spent a year practicing family law. I am so grateful for the experience working in family law because I got the opportunity to be appointed as a guardian ad litem in a handful of cases. A guardian ad litem (GAL) is a court-appointed neutral third-party that in the family law context is utilized to help the parties in litigation resolve parenting…
Have you wondered what it takes to succeed as both a summer and junior associate in a law firm? Does the idea of figuring how to manage your workload, build relationships, and develop business seem intimidating? If so, then this YLS “Tips and Tricks to Succeed as an Associate” video is for you. Our qualified panelists will provide insight on how to make your legal career thrive during the pandemic and beyond. Check out the…