Jeffrey C. Freedman

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Jeffrey C. Freedman has forty years experience representing public agencies as well as private companies in all areas of labor and employment relations law. Jeff joined Liebert Cassidy Whitmore in 2002 after having been a partner in his own labor law firm for more than twenty years and in a large national firm.

His areas of practice include representing clients in state and federal court litigation, before the EEOC, Fair Employment and Housing Commission, California OSHA, the NLRB, and other state and federal regulatory agencies.

Latest Articles

This post was authored by Jeffrey C. Freedman. Picture this: you are your agency’s Human Resources Director. One morning a fellow Director from another Department comes to visit you. She tells you she was sitting before her home computer the prior evening and found a Facebook post from one of her employees complaining about his pay and benefits, making defamatory comments about her, and stating his plan to take his issues to his union. A…
January 1, 2018, is just around the corner, and as of that date PERS contracting agencies, as well as employers in ‘37 Act county retirement systems, will for the first time have the legal ability to impose increases to the member contribution rate of their classic employees. The Public Employee Pension Reform Act of 2013 (PEPRA) was intended to put the brakes on the increasing costs of pension systems.  This has not—at least as of…
Even though the 2016 Presidential election is almost four months in the rear view mirror, controversy continues, with the news each day describing what looks like a three ring circus in Washington D.C.  Pundits have opined that our country is polarized by politics as never before: cities vs. rural areas; college educated vs. high school educated citizens; red states vs. blue states, etc.  As a result, politics remains a major topic of discussion between friends,…
The class action “cottage industry” seems to be healthy. Last year the California Supreme Court decided Brinker Restaurant Corp. v. Superior Court and held that an employer must only provide its employees with statutorily mandated meal and rest periods; the employer is not required to ensure that the employees actually take the time off. The Brinker case was filed as a class action on behalf of employees working for a company which operated a number…
The Court of Appeal decision in Sabey v. City of Pomona, issued Tuesday, April 16, 2013, will change the way public agencies and their law firms, handle advisory arbitration cases. Prior to the Sabey decision, the case of Howitt v. Superior Court (1992) 3 Cal.App.4th 1575, was understood to allow two attorneys from the same firm to discharge different functions in an advisory arbitration type proceeding as long as they erected, and respected, an ethical…
Californians will remember the special election called by former Governor Schwarzenegger in 2005 on eight ballot propositions he endorsed.  The initiative measures covered diverse issues including teacher tenure, abortions, government finance and legislative redistricting. One proposition dealt with public employee union dues and would have prohibited unions from using dues for political contributions without obtaining annual employee consent. Another would have allowed the Governor to act unilaterally in some situations to reduce public employee compensation.…
It pays to read statutes carefully. Many statutes authorizing lawsuits for employment discrimination allow an award of attorney’s fees to the prevailing party. Almost uniformly, these statutes have been construed as authorizing an award of attorney’s fees to a prevailing plaintiff as a matter of course but only to a prevailing defendant when the lawsuit was frivolous. As a result, prevailing defendants rarely if ever receive an award of attorney’s fees. Now, in a recent…
A recent decision from the California Court of Appeal has upheld the entitlement of employers to “round off” the amount of employee work time to a set fraction of an hour as long as the net impact on employee compensation is neutral and there is over time an equal amount of “rounding up” and “rounding down.” This decision means time records of employee work hours do not need to be kept to the exact minute…
A gap that existed in California law concerning continuation of health insurance coverage during maternity leave has now been filled by the California legislature.  Effective January 1, 2012, health insurers will be required to cover maternity benefits and employers who had been required to continue health insurance during a maternity leave covered by the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) will now be required to continue that coverage for the full four month maternity leave…
In the case of Pantoja v. Anton, Lorraine Pantoja worked as a receptionist/secretary for a law firm owned by Thomas Anton.  Pantoja alleges that Anton would slap her buttocks, touch her buttocks and leg, and once asked for a shoulder massage.  He also referred to his employees as “my Mexicans.”  Eventually, Anton called Pantoja a “stupid bitch” and fired her.  Pantoja sued Anton for race and sex discrimination and hostile work environment sexual harassment in violation…