Lisa S. Charbonneau

Photo of Lisa S. Charbonneau

Lisa represents and advises Liebert Cassidy Whitmore clients in all matters pertaining to labor and employment law. She represents LCW clients in employment litigation throughout the state and advises clients on issues ranging from state and federal wage and hour law compliance to the interactive process to the mandates of the Meyers-Milias-Brown Act.

Lisa has appeared in state and federal courts throughout the Bay Area, as well as before the California Labor Commissioner, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Prior to joining LCW, Ms. Charbonneau represented private employers and public and private employees in litigation matters ranging from wage and hour class actions to public employee dismissal proceedings to individual discrimination lawsuits.

Lisa received her JD from U.C. Hastings College of the Law in 2006 and was admitted to the California State Bar in December of that year. While at Hastings, Lisa served as an Equal Justice America fellow and received a grant to work on community economic development issues for the City of Detroit. Lisa earned her Bachelor of Arts with Honors in Government from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, and soon after that worked at a political magazine, The American Prospect, until she began to pursue her law degree.

Lisa was recognized as a "Rising Star" by Northern California Super Lawyers in 2012, 2013 and 2014, and in 2010 received a Community Partner Award for pro bono work with the Transgender Law Center in San Francisco, California. She is a member of the California State Bar's Litigation Section and Women Lawyers of Alameda County.

Latest Articles

California employers are subject to numerous state and federal statutes that regulate employee compensation and hours of work. Whether California Labor Code provisions, such as those that guarantee penalties for the late payment of final wages, apply to a specific employer must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Do they? For most private school employers, the answer is yes. For county and charter city employers, the answer is generally no. Indeed, Labor Code section 220(b)…
On Tuesday, November 22, 2016, Judge Amos Mazzant of the U.S. District Court in the Eastern District of Texas (a 2014 Obama-appointee) issued a preliminary injunction barring implementation of the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) new rule (“Final Rule”) raising the salary threshold for certain overtime exemptions under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).  The Final Rule was set to go into effect in less than two weeks – on December 1, 2016.  The Court’s…
In May of this year, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued a new rule that raises the federal salary basis for exempt employees to $47,476 per year, effective December 1, 2016.  The rule also increases the salary threshold level for the highly compensated employee exemption from $100,000 per year to $134,004 per year, and adjusts salary levels automatically every three years.  The Office of Management and Budget estimates the new rule will extend overtime…
One particularly difficult challenge in complying with the strict minimum wage and overtime requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act is an employer’s computerized timekeeping, payroll and/or accounting systems.  For the vast majority of public sector employers, timekeeping is automated, as is payroll and the computation of wages owed; hard-copy timecards for employees and manual overtime calculations are a thing of the past. Despite their benefits, computerized payroll systems may be difficult to update or…
On Thursday, June 2, 2016, the Ninth Circuit issued a long-awaited decision in a case called Flores v. City of San Gabriel, which involved a group of police officers who sued their City employer for three years of unpaid overtime and liquidated damages under the Fair Labor Standards Act.  The primary issue on appeal was whether the FLSA required the City to include cash payments made in lieu of health benefits into its regular…
In February 2016, the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) issued an “FAQ for Employers” on transgender rights in the workplace. The Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) bans discrimination on the basis of “sex, gender, gender identity, [and] gender expression.”  Gender expression is defined by law to mean a “person’s gender-related appearance and behavior whether or not stereotypically associated with the person’s assigned sex at birth.”  The FEHA protects transgender persons, as…
In recent years, many California public agencies of all sizes have developed absence control policies to manage employee abuse of sick leave and other types of leaves.  Generally speaking, these policies track each employee’s leave usage and establish various procedures, such as performance improvement plans and/or discipline, in the event an employee’s leave usage is deemed excessive and/or abusive.  At the same time, California law continues to expand employees’ rights to sick leave, as well…