The Attorney Marketing Center

Marketing for Lawyers Who Hate Marketing: How to Build a Successful Law Practice Without Networking, Blogging, Facebook or Twitter

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TV detective Colombo was famous for his trench coat, cigar, and glass eye, but even more famous for the way he would get witnesses to reveal things they didn’t intend to reveal. At the end of the interview, everyone would stand up and get ready to leave, the witness would relax, and just when they thought they’re in the clear, Colombo would turn to them with his trademark, “Just one more thing”. He would catch…
Many lawyers are obsessed with getting the details right. So are many artists and creative people and business leaders. Perfectionists often create superior results, but their obsession with making things “perfect” often causes them to procrastinate. Maybe you can relate. How do you do good work and get better results without getting ensnared in the net of perfectionism? The answer isn’t to fight your natural tendency, it is to re-focus it. Instead of obsessing over…
What’s the best place to sit in a conference room? It depends on the role you’re playing in the meeting, or the role you want to play. This 12 minute video explains the science behind the options we face when we choose where to sit. Many of these insights are obvious, but there are some interesting ideas you may be able to use in your next meeting. Note, this covers general meetings, (board meetings, staff…
I was at our local Staples store the other day and noticed that they had set up a sizable “meeting space” in the store, with tables and chairs, a white board and a screen for presentations. There was a sign-up board that listed several local organizations, e.g., networking groups, toastmasters, etc., that had upcoming meetings. Staples is obviously offering this free space to generate more foot traffic, something that has no doubt been waning in…
When you speak to prospective clients or anyone else you want to persuade, they are often skeptical about what you offer or propose. To overcome this, you want to make them feel safe so they will open their minds and listen to your offer. One way to do that is to use words that align with the idea that what you’re proposing is “normal”–not unusual or risky. This can be as simple as using the…
When you love your work, you look forward to getting to the office each day, your work is relatively easy to do, and you almost always get better results. The other thing that happens when you love what you do: the people in your life can sense it. Your clients and prospects, colleagues and centers of influence see your passion. They see your confidence and the ease with which you carry yourself. They know you’re…
If you could design the perfect law practice (perfect for you, that is), what would it look like? Why not take some time and write it out? Consider things such as: Where would you have your office(s)? Which practice area(s) would you focus on? Eliminate? Add? How much would you earn? What types of clients or cases would you have? How many? What billing model(s) would you use? Would you work for a big firm?…
The objective of every newsletter your write is to get your subscribers to do something. To call for an appointment or to ask questions, to reply and give you their opinion, or to share something you wrote with people they know, just to name a few. And, you have to convince readers to do that. That’s why you write a newsletter, after all. This doesn’t mean being pushy or sales-y or anything less than professional.…
One of the advantages of developing a profile of your ideal client is that it allows you to quickly see who is–and isn’t–a good fit for you. Knowing who isn’t right for you allows you to spend more time and resources marketing to and attracting those who are. Most lawyers promote their services to “everyone” with a certain problem or need and qualify the ones who respond when they speak to them. What if you…
Some lawyers’ email newsletters are too long. They cram too much information into each “issue”. This is especially true of newsletters that are published infrequently. You can see the logic. If you publish once a month, you’ve got a lot more to say than if you publish daily. But only the stalwart reads these tomes. Most people don’t. They may skim them, to see if anything catches their eye, but when there’s nothing but lengthy…