The Attorney Marketing Center

Marketing for Lawyers Who Hate Marketing: How to Build a Successful Law Practice Without Networking, Blogging, Facebook or Twitter

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Repeat clients and referrals are your most profitable clients. Your marketing plan should include strategies for: Retention (keeping clients happy, getting more of them to stick with you, and what to do to get them back if they leave) Repeat business (getting existing/former clients to hire you again and/or more often) Up-selling (getting more clients to “buy” your bigger packages/services) Cross-selling (getting clients and prospects to buy your other services (yours and your partner’s) Referrals…
Your clients can buy them for friends and relatives. Employers can buy them for employees. Business owners can give them to customers and prospects. Charities can offer them as a prize in their next raffle. I’m talking about gift cards for your services, in specific monetary denominations or that cover the entire fee for designated services. Or. . . for free consultations. “Happy Birthday, Sis–use this to get your will prepared, on me”. “I heard…
I haven’t read BJ Fogg’s best selling book, Tiny Habits, but was intrigued by a quote from it: “Celebrating a win–no matter how tiny–will quickly lead to more wins”. Reading the sales page and some reviews told me the premise–that we can effect great change in our lives by making small changes to what we (repeatedly) do–our habits–and when we celebrate our “wins,” it leads to more of the same. Ostensibly, that’s because it…
If you’re trying to tackle a big project and not making as much progress as you’d like, the reason may simply be that you’re trying to do too much too soon. In his book, Do It Tomorrow, Mark Forster provides a series of fundamental productivity principles. Number three is “Little and Often,” his prescription for handling big projects or accomplishing big goals. Forster says it’s easier to get things done if you do small…
It’s one thing to “drop” a client who hasn’t paid or who has been a pain in your gluteus maximus. It’s something else to not let them sign up in the first place. What do you do to eliminate problem clients in advance? Do you talk to them on the phone before they’re allowed to make an appointment? Do you do a background check? Ask for references? Do you accept new clients “by referral only”?…
It takes a lot of effort to attract good clients. It takes even more effort to keep them happy. Is it worth it? All of the time, energy, and money it takes to treat clients “better than they have a right to expect” is one of the best investments you can make. Here are a few reasons why: Clients who receive exceptional service are far more likely to stick with you for the long term.…
YOU: I want to bring in more clients; I’ve made a list of 18 things I could do but I’m not motivated to do any of them. Do you have any advice? ME: You’ve come to the right place, son. Pull up a chair and let me set you straight. Now, the way I see it, you have 3 options: Option 1: Make another list. Go find 18 more things you could do, and keep…
I just started doing something with my digital files and notes I wish I’d done a long time ago. I designated a place to put everything I don’t need now but might need or want someday. I’ve set up folders and notebooks in my various apps and labeled them “Archives”. My archives now hold: Closed files Inactive projects (not started, aborted, finished) Notes/docs/audios/videos from old business ventures Old tax, banking, and insurance docs Backups of…
You know your clients want you to treat them well, charge reasonable fees, and keep them informed about the progress of their case. But do you have this in writing? I’m talking about a “pledge” or a “Client’s Bill of Rights”–something to show clients and prospects, and for you and your staff to commit to and follow. Start by writing internal guidelines and objectives, for you and your staff. For example, you want your clients…
A common reason offered by attorneys who haven’t started a blog or newsletter is that they won’t be able to keep it up. Either they don’t have the time, or they don’t think they’ll have enough to write about. But. . . You’ll never run out of ideas to write about. I promise. Even if you practice in a very narrow niche, the law changes, the cases and clients change, the strategies change, the ideas…