The Attorney Marketing Center

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Latest from The Attorney Marketing Center

You may not be the best in your field or even as good as your competition. You may not do anything different from other lawyers in your field. One way to stand out and make a name for yourself is to find someone doing something noteworthy or interesting or controversial and help them. Marketing your practice doesn’t necessarily mean promoting yourself. You can promote someone or something else and ride the wave of interest that…
It’s usually best to deliver bad news to a client by phone or in person, not by email or letter. As I said in a previous post, “You can explain what happened, answer the client’s questions, discuss the options, and work together to find the path forward.” Your tone of voice tells the client how you feel about the issue. He’ll hear your concern and appreciate that you personally called. They may still be upset,…
Yesterday, I pontificated about the value and importance of educating your clients and prospects about problems they may not know they have and about the solutions you have available for them. That’s your warm market. It’s different in the cold market. In your warm market–clients, prospects, newsletter subscribers, and others who recognize your name–teaching them what they don’t know doesn’t cost much. They’re already on your list. If you send them an email, they’ll open…
Some of the clients and prospects on your list don’t know they have a legal problem, let alone that you have the ability to help them. You need to educate them. Tell them what they need to know about their problem or potential problem, and what might happen if they do nothing about it. Don’t leave it up to them to figure this out. Don’t make them wait until their problem worsens. Tell them what…
Last week, I reminded you to do something you already know you need to do: anticipate problems and nip them in the bud. A checklist can help. Make a list of all of the “points of interaction” your clients have with your office. This would include things like What they see when they visit the home page of your website What happens when they fill out a form What happens when they call your…
I went to the dentist yesterday for a cleaning and exam but my dentist wasn’t there. He was on vacation in Hawaii. “Didn’t they tell you?” my hygienist asked. They (whoever that was) hadn’t, so no. And no exam. Strike one: Not telling patients you’ll be out of town and giving them the option to re-schedule. Strike two: I’d already paid for the exam, so now what? Go without it? Make another appointment and come…
If you’re like most attorneys, you pay attention to what your competition charges and make an effort to keep your fees in line with theirs. You don’t have to. Because fees are way down the list of factors clients cite for choosing their attorney. And because there are things you can do to distinguish yourself from your competition, making it more likely that clients will choose you (and stick with you) even if you charge…
So many ideas, so little time. So many ways to promote your services, generate leads, make new business contacts, and improve response to your existing campaigns. It never stops. Which is why sometimes, you never start. Having options is a good thing. But it can be overwhelming. The solution, or at least one sensible approach, is to choose one idea, channel, strategy, tactic or tool, and (temporarily) go “all in”. Let’s say you’ve decided that…
How do you keep the marketing fires lit when you’d rather do other things? What strategies or tactics do you use? Have you’ve eliminated things you especially don’t like and replaced them with a few you do? Do you automate and delegate as much as possible? Do you “chunk it down” into small, easy-to-do tasks you can do a few minutes at a time? Do you accept that marketing is important, put on your big…
My wife and I visited a doctor once but our visit didn’t last long. The doctor came with all the right credentials and was highly recommended by peers and patients, but as soon as we met him, we didn’t trust him and left. Why? Because he wouldn’t look either of us in the eye. He talked to the wall, to the bookcase, to the office door, but (it seemed), not to us. It was probably…