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Your lists are overflowing with ideas. Ideas for growing your practice, managing your investments, raising your kids, places to see and things to do and thousands of other things you saw or heard or thought. You have pages of notes and “someday/maybe” tasks, deferred projects, techniques for getting more organized, strategies for increasing your productivity, and ways to find inner peace. You have lists of books to read and videos to watch, ideas for blog…
I don’t use social media for personal matters. I rarely share or comment, I don’t post photos or talk about my personal life. I may or may not accept friend requests (if I see them), I don’t “chat” online, and I don’t have any social media apps on my phone. I don’t do much more for work. I share my blog posts as I publish them, I check in now and then to see what’s…
Where do you find ideas for writing interesting and relevant posts your clients and prospects look forward to reading? Here are 3 “can’t fail” places: 1) Books I know, you already read plenty. But if you only read about the law, or you only read short articles you find online, you’re missing out on an opportunity to create superlative content. Read more books and talk about the ideas you learn. Read history, philosophy, and books…
Most networking is a slow grind. Often, it’s a complete waste of time. No wonder many lawyers avoid it. And yet, for some, networking is a remarkable tool for generating new business, new connections, and new opportunities. The problem is that many would-be networkers target the wrong people or groups, people who are unlikely to need their services and are able to pay for them. They may also network with people who aren’t able (or…
In music, “back phrasing” is when “a singer intentionally sings in front of the beat (or behind it–“front phrasing”). I’m told that Willie Nelson does this effectively, as do many jazz artists. The purpose is to create “negative space,” which ostensibly gives the ear a place to rest or surprises the listener with notes or timing that defy expectations. It’s attractive because it sounds different. More complex. More interesting. Negative space is also used in…
This was a headline for an ad I saw on social media. It’s a good headline and a good question for those who want to create more content to use in their marketing. Which is something every lawyer should do. My challenge to you is to answer that question and then turn your knowledge into a short presentation, a long article or blog post, or a series of emails for your newsletter. Because people want…
Some clients are better than others. They give you more business, send more referrals, and otherwise contribute more than other clients to your bottom line and your success. The same goes for professional contacts. Some send more referrals, promote your offers, and help you build your list of contacts and subscribers. I encourage you to go through your list(s) and write down the names of your best clients and professional contacts. Then, cut this down…
Getting interviews is easy. Tell people you’d like to interview them for a book, an article or blog post, or as a guest on your podcast or channel. Most people will say yes. Most people are flattered to be asked and excited to get exposure for their work or their cause. What’s in it for you? More content for your blog or newsletter or channel. Or a book–I turned an interview with successful appellate lawyer,…
I talked to a business associate today. She’s getting leads via email on LinkedIn, getting some inquires, and wanted to know what I recommend she do to follow up. We talked about what she was doing and what she wanted to happen, and then I told her something I know she knew but needed to be reminded of. I told her she needs to talk to these people. You can use LinkedIn (or whatever) to…
When you’re making plans for the coming year, the first you should do is review the previous year. Take 30 minutes and think about what happened last year and what you can do to make this year better. Tim Ferriss does an annual review by going through his calendar, week by week, and noting everything that was positive and everything that was negative. He uses this information to create a list of what to do…