The University of Guelph

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The University of Guelph Blogs

Latest from The University of Guelph

We’ve once again updated the Guide to Mitigating the Risk of Infection in Veterinary Practices During the COVID-19 Pandemic (14-Apr-2021).  It can also be accessed through the Ontario Veterinary Medical Association Coronavirus FAQ webpage (member login required). I’ll be happy when we can stop updating these guidelines. Progress is good and adding new information is useful. I just long for the day when we don’t need them. Previous versions of the guidance and other…
I’ve taken a look back at some posts from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, to see how my thoughts have evolved, what I got right and what I screwed up. We have a lot of COVID-19 posts (starting from when we called it “novel coronavirus” or “Wuhan coronavirus” before the SARS-CoV-2 terminology existed). Here are some highlights and “grading” of my comments from a selection of posts January 20, 2020 “New coronavirus: Companion
As spring approaches, a pressing question has come to the minds of many kids: “Can the Easter bunny get COVID-19?” or “Can Easter bunny eggs spread COVID-19?” Fortunately, the answer is no. Easter bunnies are safe from this virus and kids don’t have to worry about whatever the Easter bunny leaves behind. Based on what we know to date, “regular” rabbits aren’t very susceptible to the SARS-CoV-2 virus.  Some types of rabbits can be
I tweeted recently about the first report of the B.1.1.7 SARS-CoV-2 variant being found in animals, specifically in a dog and cat in Texas, which deserves some more discussion. Also a new pre-print article (i.e. non-peer-reviewed paper) was posted recently that will probably raise more concerns, so I figured I’d better write about that one too. Texas A&M Research Uncovers First Known COVID-19 UK Variant In Animals The B.1.1.7 variant of SARS-CoV-2, which first…
We partnered with the Canadian Academy of Veterinary Dermatology to update our MRSP fact sheets for pet owners, including a new look, and a French translation!  Access them using the links below, or on the Worms & Germs Resources – Pets page. What is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius? (English) Qu’est-ce que le Staphylococcus pseudintermedius résistant à la méthicilline? (Français)
Here’s a pot pourri of reports of staphylococcal infections in humans linked to dogs. Specifically, they’re infections caused by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, a common dog-adapted species of Staphylococcus. (If you get freaked out reading these, make sure you read the end of the post so you also get the context.) A 41-year-old man with a history of skin disease and receiving parenteral nutrition (i.e. being fed intravenously) presented with fever, and developed a recurrent infection of
The companion animal Ontario Animal Health Network has produced a series of mini-podcasts on COVID-19 precautions in veterinary clinics, featuring none other than Dr. Scott Weese.  Each mini-podcast features a quick 3-5 minute “lighting round” on common questions and topics – bite-sized bits for busy practitioners and clinic staff who may only have a few minutes to spare these days.  Current topics include: Avoid the 3 Cs: Crowding, close contact, confined spaces Rethinking clinic…
I’m always on the lookout for good-looking, easy-access resources to help communicate (and to help others communicate) messages around safe and responsible pet ownership, which is how this blog got its start!  I also don’t like re-inventing the wheel when I don’t have to, and I appreciate that many organizations have people with vastly better design and layout skills than my own 😉 During the COVID-19 pandemic, the concern around the risks of SARS-CoV-2 both…
Lyme disease vaccine is a non-core vaccine, meaning it’s not needed for all dogs in all areas. It’s an effective vaccine, and I’d consider it a reasonable vaccine to give to dogs in (or visiting) higher risk areas, especially when there might be owner compliance issues with tick preventive medication. Available tick preventatives are very good, but sometimes people forget to give them on time, so vaccination is a good backup plan for those situations…