Traklight

In law school, our founder Mary Juetten was shocked by how many businesses ignored or accidentally infringed on others' intellectual property (IP). She learned that these behaviors were due to a lack of understanding IP and a fear of attorney costs.

So Mary launched Traklight - a simple and affordable way to identify, manage, and protect valuable intangible assets including IP.

Our values: We are Geese. We are Bees. We are Wolves.

Traklight Blogs

Latest from Traklight

A big part of IP law is the ability for companies to protect their ideas and their brand — the main part, really. And it’s important and necessary for such protections to exist, to prevent things like theft and infringement from becoming rampant problems with little or no means or seeking justice and recompense. But we’ve seen that the power and protection offered to rights holders through the law also enable bad behaviors as well,…
Social media doesn’t have the best history when it comes to copyright to this point in its history. The poor record makes a kind of sense: it’s hard to govern a platform with tens of millions of users, provided that we believe they even want to regulate behavior, and tech companies in general have struggled to find the right measure of action to take, often swinging wildly between indifference and overreaction based upon the crisis…
“Use it or lose it” isn’t a principle we generally associate with ownership — we all have closets filled with unused stuff that nevertheless remains ours for years — but it is one of the hallmarks of trademark law. Whatever your opinion of our current IP laws, it’s almost unquestionably a good thing that individuals and companies can file for a trademark only to sit on it, not unlike those domain squatters eyeing an opportunity…
I’ve written before about the problems with both the aggressive assertion of copyright and the inability of online platforms to discern legitimate claims from the misuse of reporting tools on offer, with YouTube as the convergence point of these dual phenomena. Invariably the response from these platforms is that their user base is too large and too spread out to offer any effective administrative policing, so the task falls to users to police one another.…
We don’t often talk about trade secrets in this space, because they are by definition secretive and unreported. It’s easy to understand and follow stories about trademarks or patents because we can identify what’s been infringed upon and how it relates to the products we know and consume. Trade secrets, on the other hand, have to stay vague in what we read of them; companies don’t want their proprietary information to disseminate any further than…
There’s much made of the importance of copyright for creators, and for good reason: without any sort of legal protection or ownership rights, the act of creation itself would be meaningless, with the ultimate profit and benefit for a work ultimately going to whomever has the resources to both exploit it and muscle out the original creator. Why record a song if a more popular artist could simply come along and record their own version…
Wearable tech has been a fairly recent trend, unless you want to count the calculator watch. And preeminent in that trend has been Fitbit, which offers devices that monitor your activity and your health, should you actually want to know about such things. To those of us less technically-inclined, it seems like magic that a small device can determine our daily steps and our heart-rate and any number of other data points by just sitting…
It’s easy to wonder, given how relatively easy it is to search the respective databases containing registered trademarks, why anyone would thus infringe upon those marks given that they could or should know the error of their ways. One view is that it’s a simple oversight on the part of the offender, an honest mistake, a view that is both accurate and somewhat naive at once. The other interpretation is that there is malice aforethought,…
Say what you want about American intellectual property law (and I do), but it certainly lets people try their luck at obtaining just about any sort of mark or patent, even if the application is ultimately rejected. It’s undoubtedly someone’s notion of the American ideal that ambition in this arena not be bound by common sense or an actual understanding of the law but solely by their willingness to try and get one over on…
Questions about the future of intellectual property are seemingly tied to the future of creativity as it relates to technology. We’ve already seen the USPTO look for input and guidance as to new rules for copyright law regarding works created by artificial intelligence, and the matter will only become more pressing as AI becomes more adept at creating unique works that warrant copyright protection. It’s a complicated topic, one that wrestles with questions originated…