Traklight

In law school, our founder Mary Juetten was shocked by how many businesses ignored or accidentally infringed on others' intellectual property (IP). She learned that these behaviors were due to a lack of understanding IP and a fear of attorney costs.

So Mary launched Traklight - a simple and affordable way to identify, manage, and protect valuable intangible assets including IP.

Our values: We are Geese. We are Bees. We are Wolves.

Traklight Blogs

Latest from Traklight

It’s been a long-standing matter of contention as to the right to alter a piece of artistic work. Generally speaking, if someone is to make alterations in a manner consistent with added artistic value, they have far more leeway than might be given otherwise under intellectual property law. But what if you’re just removing things from said work? The concept of “filtering” was at the heart of a lawsuit brought against streaming service VidAngel by…
IP law in the creative field is meant to protect against the commercial exploitation of someone’s work by non-rightsholders, but what happens if the infringing work in question is never meant to see the light of day but gets out anyway? That’s the question at the heart of a lawsuit brought by singer-songwriter Tracy Chapman against the pop star Nicki Minaj over copyright infringement. Chapman accuses Minaj of using her song “Baby Can I Hold…
What happens when a product reaches a level of ubiquity so prevalent that it becomes representative of both itself and its competitors, regardless of origin or manufacturer? Take for example Coca Cola: in certain areas of the country, “a Coke” is a catch-all term for any soft drink, even though that particular beverage is but one of many available to consumers. As trademarks go, however, Coca Cola has no grounds to take any sort of…
We’ve all probably experienced the phenomenon of cascading bad luck, wherein misfortune piles upon itself until we feel that fate has conspired against us. The alarm doesn’t go off, the car won’t start, work projects go awry —eventually we feel like kindred spirits with Job. But however bad our toughest periods might have been, we can at least take comfort in the fact that we’re not TikTok. The social media platform, which has handle left…
I’ve written previously about the relatively recent problem of video games reproducing real-life products and places and the potential for trademark infringement, at least in the minds of those companies who find their products in games that seek to replicate facsimile of the world as we know it. Not every game seeks to do that, however; in fact, most games use the technology available to create something new entirely, often recognizable as something that can…
Among the many benefits that the proliferation of the internet and search engines have provided, finding song lyrics wouldn’t rank among the most important, but it would certainly be a more popular use than, say, looking up academic papers for school work. And it’s an underrated benefit; for years prior, you had to rely on liner notes from records or CDs, and that’s even if the artist put the lyrics there. Otherwise, you were left…
Innovation is what spurs tech companies to the top of the proverbial pile, but, once there, some seem to lose that innovative spirit, relying instead upon their accrued power to stay atop the marketplace. Instead of coming up with new ideas, it’s easier to simply buy up the innovative companies out there, or perhaps just copy the innovation you see. At the risk of generalization, Big Tech can get lazy, and that laziness can result…
What right does any company have over names that are similar only due to that company’s sheer size and ubiquity? It’s true that certain brands can be evoked not only by their name and logo, but by an entire subcategory of similar designs and conventions, but should that be the case, from a legal perspective? Maybe it speaks poorly of our regulatory bodies that said companies are allowed to lay claim to names and marks…
In cases of infringement, intent is irrelevant to the substantive facts of a case. Either something infringes upon a copyright or trademark or patent, or it doesn’t; whether the accused meant to do it or not changes nothing. Still, it probably matters to our ideas about justice and recompense as to whether intent existed or not. We’re far more likely to be forgiving of a careless mistake made without malice than instances of deliberate theft,…
For some products, form matters as much as function, if not more so. With something like, say, your lawnmower, the aesthetics aren’t so important as long as it performs the work of cutting your grass. But your car? Your car says something about you, given how much you might be investing in it. And it says something about the company that made it, which is why some car makers have labored for decades towards mastery…