Tressler LLP

Tressler LLP is a national law firm headquartered in Chicago, with eight offices located in five states - California, Illinois, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. Tressler is comprised primarily of attorneys who devote their practice to the representation of the insurance industry in coverage analysis and resolution, litigation, underwriting consultation, product development, defense, claims management and reinsurance.

Tressler attorneys also represent clients in commercial litigation, employment, corporate transactions and intellectual property law. Tressler has one of the most experienced and multi-faceted government law practices in Illinois.

In All America Ins. Co. v. Lampasona Concrete Court., 120 N.E.2d 1258 (Mass.App.Ct. 2019), a Massachusetts appellate court vacated a trial court’s decision and held the trial court erred in ruling that Exclusion J(6) precluded coverage for the cost of removing and replacing a hospital’s flooring structure when the insured subcontractor had only worked on the concrete slab underlying the floor. All America had sought a declaration that Lampasona’s CGL policy excluded coverage for damage…
On June 25, 2019, Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker signed House Bill (HB) 1438, legalizing recreational marijuana use in the state of Illinois. The “Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act” will go into effect on January 1, 2020. You can hang it on your office wall as surely as you hung that Jimi Hendrix poster on your bedroom wall back in the ‘70s. Soon adults age 21 years and older may legally possess and consume cannabis, cannabis…
In Hershey Creamery Co. v. Liberty Mutual Fire Ins. Co., No. 1:18-CV-694, 2019 WL 1988397 (M.D. Pa. May 6, 2019), the United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania held a patent and trademark infringement lawsuit against an insured triggered a duty to defend under “personal and advertising injury” coverage.  The dispositive issue was whether the complaint, which was premised on alleged infringement on the plaintiff’s marks in the insured’s in-store signage and…
The law related to Illinois Biometric Information Protection Act (“BIPA”) came to a halt over the last year or so while the Illinois Supreme Court analyzed what constitutes an injury under the Act. As expected, courts have started to once again visit the various legal issues related to biometric data now that the Rosenbach decision has been issued. Now that BIPA cases are moving through the courts again, one major issue will be what is…
Getting members to participate in board member elections can be like pulling teeth. The more convenient you make the process, the more likely to get members to participate. Fortunately, the Illinois Condominium Property Act (the “Condo Act”) and the Illinois Common Interest Community Association Act (“CICAA”) allow Boards to adopt rules and regulations to permit electronic voting. Not only is electronic voting convenient, but it can save the association money by not having to pay for printing or…
In Nieves v. Bartlett, the United States Supreme Court denied permitting an arrestee, Russell Bartlett, a cause of action for retaliatory arrest against the two arresting police officers.  Nieves v. Bartlett, 587 U.S. _____, No. 17-1174 (2019).  Bartlett was arrested for disorderly conduct and resisting arrest by Sgt. Nieves and Trooper Weight during Paxson, Alaska’s annual “Arctic Man” festival.  The arresting officers stated Bartlett was “highly intoxicated,” yelling and being aggressive at the time of…
The current roster of threats–ransomware, phishing schemes and hacking–are well understood at this point. Of course, these threats are constantly evolving as we live in a world where criminals get bored quickly and need to move on. The newest privacy threat may involve elaborately faked videos, called “deepfakes,” which may be used to disparage people. A manipulated video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi recently went viral was slowed down to make it appear she was
Dorothy Crawley was a tenured teacher at Wells Preparatory Elementary School.  After receiving an anonymous tip that she had used sick days to take a Caribbean cruise, the Chicago School Board investigated and then filed charges against her alleging that, among other things, she made false representations in her employment record, violated Board policy prohibiting the use of sick days for personal time and engaged in conduct unbecoming of a school employee. The Board recommended…