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Latest from Copo Strategies

Bottom line: Attorneys and their clients should be aware that their adversaries could publicly disclose the substance of settlement discussions in their legal disputes as a way to influence the Court of Public Opinion and, perhaps, those very same settlement discussions. There’s no Federal Rule of Evidence 408 or its local equivalent in the Court of Public Opinion. While settlement negotiations are generally inadmissible in a court of law, they are admissible in the Court…
Bottom line: In high-profile legal matters, attorneys and their clients must be strategic about when they engage the Court of Public Opinion. It is often said that in life, “timing is everything.” That saying applies with equal force to engaging the Court of Public Opinion. When attorneys engage the Court of Public Opinion in connection with a client’s legal dispute, they often focus on what they’re going to say and who they’re going to say…
Bottom line: Multiple attorneys can each get publicity for the same lawsuit if they are strategic about their publicity-seeking efforts. A prospective client of ours recently asked us the following question. When more than one attorney represents a client in a legal dispute, can more than one attorney get publicity for their involvement in that legal dispute?  Yes. But. It’s not uncommon for multiple attorneys to represent the same client in a particular legal dispute. In theory, that…
Bottom line: Attorneys now need to be prepared to defend THEMSELVES when they are representing a client in a high-profile matter. Attorneys are used to going to bat for their clients outside of court regarding those clients’ cases. But increasingly, attorneys need to be prepared to go to bat for themselves outside of court regarding their clients’ cases.  We are seeing a trend more and more of attorneys drawing scrutiny from the media, from social media, and…
Bottom line: Court filings in high-profile legal disputes can cause an uproar in the Court of Public Opinion. One of the core pieces of advice I give to attorneys and their clients when they are contemplating engaging the Court of Public Opinion, or when they’re already sucked into a high-profile case and they have to fight back, is that they need to be cognizant of how what they do in a court of law will…
Bottom line: When a media outlet gets something wrong about you or a client, you must fight back—especially when that error can cause damage to your or your client’s reputation or business. At some point in his or her career, an attorney, his or her law firm, or his or her client will likely be the subject of bad publicity as a result of a media outlet getting something very wrong in its reporting. The…
Bottom line: Location matters when holding a press conference. When attorneys plan a press conference, the location of the press conference will go a long way in determining how effective the press conference will be—and how well-attended it will be by reporters.  My number one rule for a press conference in terms of location is never to schedule a press conference where you don’t have total control over the location. If you are an attorney and…
Bottom line: When attorneys hold press conferences regarding their clients’ legal disputes, they need not only be persuasive. They must be ethical and avoid defaming others. When attorneys hold a press conference regarding a client’s legal dispute, they are rightly focused on being persuasive and presenting their client’s story in a way that will help influence the Court of Public Opinion favorably. By doing this, hopefully, the client will be able to resolve his or her…
Bottom line: To maximize your odds of media attendance at a press conference, you must schedule your press conference at the right time. Thinking about holding a press conference to help tell your client’s side of the story of a legal dispute that he or she is involved in?  You’re going to want to pick the right time of day for the press conference to help maximize media attendance. When talking about the timing of press…
Bottom line: Don’t send multiple email attachments to reporters. Use shared folders instead. WHOA!  You weren’t really going to just email a reporter and attach a dozen documents to that email, were you?  Seventeen long years ago when I first started talking to reporters and working in public relations, there was a mindset that we really shouldn’t be sending attachments to reporters, especially if they hadn’t already requested them in advance.  Now, in the past 17…