Copo Strategies

Copo Strategies Blogs

Blog Authors

Latest from Copo Strategies

Bottom line: When it comes to marketing, law firms often get more mileage out of noteworthy achievements than they do from newsworthy ones. Think newsworthy events at your law firm are the best way to move the needle with referrals and prospective clients? Think again. When it comes to law firm marketing, NOTEworthy events can give you more bang for the buck. Before I go any further, let me explain the difference between newsworthy events…
Bottom line: It is possible to provide a sound bite to reporters about damages without revealing exactly how much you’re seeking. When plaintiffs attorneys and their clients seek publicity for the filing of a legal complaint, they often get tripped up by one particular question from reporters. “What are the damages that you’re alleging in the case?” Now, most of the time when a reporter is going to cover, or at least interested in covering,…
Bottom line: A preemptive strike is one of the few ways defense attorneys can turn the tables on plaintiffs attorneys and prosecutors in high-profile legal disputes. Defense attorneys are typically at a disadvantage in the Court of Public Opinion because they’re always playing defense. But what if there was a way for defense attorneys and their clients to flip the script in the Court of Public Opinion and actually take control and lead the news…
Bottom line: In 2020 and beyond, PR campaigns around high-profile legal disputes are likely to feature aggressive public statements, creative uses of technology, and defendants playing offense One of the largest and most profitable law firms in the world is currently embroiled in a high-profile legal dispute with one of its female law partners. Interestingly, the aggressive public relations campaigns that both sides are employing in the dispute are indicative of five trends for 2020…
Bottom line: When attorneys get wind of breaking news that is unfavorable to an adversary in one of their clients’ cases, they should newsjack that breaking news by going to the media and making their client’s case in the Court of Public Opinion. Pop quiz! An adversary in one of your clients’ cases is in the news for alleged misconduct outside of the claims you’ve raised in that case. Do you go to the media…
Bottom line: In high-profile cases, introductory paragraphs and preliminary statements must be written for audiences OUTSIDE of court: the media and the public. Most attorneys are already using preliminary statements and introductory paragraphs in their court papers to provide a roadmap to the court and opposing counsel of the factual arguments and legal arguments that the attorneys are making in those court papers. But when an attorney is involved in a high-profile case, he or…
Bottom line: An attorney should never waste an opportunity to publicly tell a client’s side of the story—even when a reporter calls them seeking comment mere minutes before the reporter’s deadline. What to do when a reporter calls you for comment at 5:00 pm regarding a new complaint or other court document that was just filed against your client but that you haven’t even had a chance to review?  It is not uncommon for a…
Bottom line: Generally speaking, the longer the public spotlight shines on a plaintiff’s lawsuit, the better If you’re a plaintiffs’ attorney working on a high-profile case, you need a Day 100 Strategy for that case.  What the hell is a Day 100 Strategy? I’ll tell you in a moment. But first, let’s take a step back. If you’re a plaintiffs’ attorney working on a high-profile case, you want to keep that case in the media and…
Bottom line: Op-eds are an underutilized tool that attorneys and their clients can use to tell their side of the story of their legal disputes to local audiences in order to persuade the Court of Public Opinion. If you’ve ever read a newspaper, you are familiar with an op-ed.  An op-ed is an opinion piece written by someone not affiliated with the media outlet that runs opposite the editorial page in that media outlet — thus the…
Bottom line: Attorneys and their clients should be aware that their adversaries could publicly disclose the substance of settlement discussions in their legal disputes as a way to influence the Court of Public Opinion and, perhaps, those very same settlement discussions. There’s no Federal Rule of Evidence 408 or its local equivalent in the Court of Public Opinion. While settlement negotiations are generally inadmissible in a court of law, they are admissible in the Court…