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Agency’s Tactics For Battling The Gender Pay Gap Now Uncertain In a not-entirely surprising September 12, 2019 notice in the Federal Register, the EEOC announced that it plans on not renewing an Obama-era rule requiring employers to provide pay data as part of their annual employer information (EEO-1) report until after it assesses whether the two years’ worth of pay data a federal court ordered it to obtain under the rule is useful to its…
Agency’s Tactics For Battling The Gender Pay Gap Now Uncertain In a not-entirely surprising September 12, 2019 notice in the Federal Register, the EEOC announced that it plans on not renewing an Obama-era rule requiring employers to provide pay data as part of their annual employer information (EEO-1) report until after it assesses whether the two years’ worth of pay data a federal court ordered it to obtain under the rule is useful to its…
Lawmakers’ Attention Likely To Turn Back To Paid Sick Leave Legislation This Fall With so many new major Illinois employment laws already enacted this year, even the most well-informed HR professionals would be forgiven if they felt unable to predict and plan for the next wave of workplace legislation likely to come down the pike before year’s end. Fortunately, Springfield lawmakers signaled their intentions on August 2, 2019 when Governor Pritzker signed into law the…
Time is Now to Comply with Salary History Law Many Illinois employers returning from summer holiday are facing a rude awakening as they discover that they now have less than a month – until September 29, 2019, to be precise – to revamp longstanding hiring practices or face sizable liability. As we previously reported here, earlier this summer Governor J.B. Pritzker signed into law a bill adding new teeth to Illinois’ Equal Pay Act.…
Time is Now to Comply with Salary History Law Many Illinois employers returning from summer holiday are facing a rude awakening as they discover that they now have less than a month – until September 29, 2019, to be precise – to revamp longstanding hiring practices or face sizable liability. As we previously reported here, earlier this summer Governor J.B. Pritzker signed into law a bill adding new teeth to Illinois’ Equal Pay Act.…
Latest Labor Board guidance may create more confusion and risk for HR On August 14, 2019, the National Labor Relations Board ruled in Cordúo Restaurants, Inc. that an employer could change its mandatory arbitration agreement to bar its workers from opting into a class action in response to being sued for wage and hour violations, and that a supervisor’s threatening statements to workers that they would be fired if they failed to sign the agreements…
Agency Spotlights School Visit Entitlement With Illinois employers’ current focus on all the new employment laws coming into effect in 2019-20, which we’ve summarized here, it could be easy for an HR practitioner to lose sight of existing laws and their new applications in our ever-changing world. On August 8, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor served up a useful reminder of how one such law — the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)…
Illinois Workplace Transparency Act Signed Into law And NLRB Announces New Union Election Policies The heat of the summer doesn’t seem to be slowing down State and Federal lawmakers. Both parties seem set on making their mark before the Pritzker honeymoon ends and the doldrums of the Presidential election season kicks in. Here’s the latest: Illinois #MeToo Bill Now The Law For instance, on Friday, August 9, 2019, Governor Pritzker signed into law the Workplace…
Law Adds to Busy Summer as Many Employers Also Prepare EEOC Pay Data Disclosures On July 31, 2019, Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker signed into law HB834, amending the Illinois Equal Pay Act in ways that will fundamentally alter hiring practices across the Land of Lincoln. By doing so, Illinois became one of at least 13 states that now restrict employers’ ability to use pay history in hiring and compensation decisions, as part of the effort…
Illinois metropolis becomes fourth US city to require advance notice of work schedules As we predicted here, the Chicago City Council passed the “Chicago Fair Workweek Ordinance” on July 26, 2019. The Ordinance replaces a similar predictable scheduling ordinance that had been proposed and tabled earlier this year. It aims to curtail employers’ use of so-called “standby time” work scheduling practices that often result in wide, unpredictable fluctuations in workers’ work hours and income…