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After enacting its non-compete law on April 7, 2016, Utah has twice amended the law to address additional restrictions on non-competes in the broadcasting industry. Governor Gary Herbert signed the second of those amended bills on March 22, 2019. The Original Non-Compete Law Utah’s original non-compete law, which we covered in an article dated April 7, 2016, imposed a one-year post-employment time limit on non-competes, except where the non-competes were part of a severance agreement or where…
As we have reported in previous articles, the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division has repeatedly reaffirmed its intent to criminally prosecute companies that restrict labor market competition through the use of unlawful no-poach and wage-fixing agreements. On May 17, 2018, a high-ranking Division official offered further guidance by announcing that the Division is taking a heightened look at unlawful no-poach agreements and other antitrust violations in the healthcare industry. Antitrust Enforcement Policy In The Trump…
In the past week, two states have made modifications to their respective non-compete laws. On March 27, 2018, Utah imposed special restrictions on the use of non-compete agreements in the broadcasting industry.  One day later, Idaho modified the standard of proof that must be followed when a company seeks an injunction against a former employee or independent contractor who is violating a non-compete covenant. Utah Restricts Use Of Non-Competes In Broadcasting Industry On March 27,…
The chief prosecutor in the U.S. Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division signaled last week that his unit expects to initiate criminal actions against multiple companies accused of entering unlawful pacts not to hire each other’s employees.  Such action would fulfill earlier promises, by both the Trump and Obama Administrations, to treat employment-related antitrust violations with the same seriousness afforded to more traditional, consumer-based antitrust issues. The public often thinks of price-fixing and other consumer-focused schemes…
Conrad S. Kee from our Salt Lake City office and Cliff Atlas, co-chair of the firm’s non-compete practice group have written on the firm’s website about two new important laws in Utah, the Post-Employment Restrictions Act and the Computer Abuse and Data Recovery Act.…
M. Robin Davis and Conrad S. Kee have written on the Jackson Lewis website about a recent decision from the North Carolina Supreme Court reversing a court of appeals decision and re-affirming that judges in that state may only apply a limited blue pencil to non-compete agreements.    …
In a 3-2 decision, the Utah Supreme Court has held that there is a presumption of harm for claims made under the Utah Uniform Trade Secrets Act, Utah Code § 13-24-1, et seq., and for claims for breach of a non-disclosure agreement when a former employee takes confidential information or trade secrets from her recent employer. InnoSys v. Mercer, 2015 UT 80 (Aug. 28, 2015). Background Amanda Mercer, an engineer formerly employed by InnoSys,…
A few days ago, the New York Times printed a photo of an U.S. registered Bombardier Challenger private jet at the Tehran airport that turned out to be registered to the Bank of Utah, a small community bank in Ogden, Utah, that apparently holds the trust certificates for many aircraft.  Later, it was reported that the plane may be owned by Engineers & Planners Company Ltd., a Ghanaian mining services company whose CEO is the…
A recent Illinois federal court decision has called into question the much begrudged holding from the Illinois Appellate Court for the First District, First Division, in Eric Fifield and Enterprise Financial Group, Inc. v. Premier Dealer Services, Inc., 373 Ill. Dec. 379, 993 N.E. 2d 938 (Ill. App. Ct. June 24, 2013). The Fifield Decision  In Fifield, the Illinois Appellate Court heard an appeal from the Circuit Court of Cook County, which had granted a…
In a recent Tennessee case, Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC v. Melissa Clemens, No. 2:13-CV-239 (E.D. Tenn., Nov. 4, 2013), the Court entered a preliminary injunction prohibiting a former employee from soliciting customers or prospective customers she served while working for Fidelity, from soliciting Fidelity’s employees, and from using Fidelity’s confidential information.  As  we previously stated regarding the Dill v. Continental decision, the Fidelity case serves as another reminder that reasonably drafted restrictive covenants are very much enforceable in Tennessee when reasonable under the…