Harrington Communications

Harrington Communications help firms gain awareness, build influence, and fuel business development through digital and content marketing. Stronger brands, better websites, and bigger books of business start at Harrington Communications.

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This post originally appeared on attorneyatwork.com Most of us entered the new year with great intentions to make changes to boost productivity. And then we got smacked in the face by the unceasing demands and stressors that pummel modern-day professionals. Good intentions succumbed to urgency. The problem with resolutions, goal setting, intentions — whatever you want to call the trigger for behavioral change — is that we typically focus on adding some new layer of…
This post originally appeared on Law.com Lawyers work hard. It’s what they do. The good news is that hard work can be deeply satisfying. It feels good to do a job well done. Accomplishment gives us meaning. Hopefully this resonates with you because it’s a feeling you’ve experienced before, at least in athletics or academics, if not yet in your professional career as an associate. But it’s not just me making this assertion about the…
This post originally appeared on JD Supra. There are more options than ever for law firms who want to market and grow their practices. This often leads firms to invest in many different tactics, hedging their bets by spreading their resources widely like one dollar chips scattered across a roulette table. Marketing, of course, should not be like gambling, with little to determine the outcome other than the luck of the draw. It should be…
This post originally appeared on Attorney at Work. In the classic ’80s comedy “Brewster’s Millions,” Richard Pryor plays a minor league baseball player who has to spend $30 million in 30 days in order to inherit $300 million from his great-uncle. Predictably, he goes on a wild spending spree (for example, he purchases a rare stamp and uses it to mail a letter) in an effort to exhaust his budget. Sure, You Can Buy Attention…
This post originally appeared on Attorney at Work. Effective marketing allows you to create a pipeline of prospects who become aware of and interested in what you have to say and offer. For most of these prospects, the need to engage a lawyer’s services at any given point in time will not be urgent. But for some, the need will be acute. If you lavish your personalized business development efforts on these highly qualified…
This post originally appeared on JD Supra. In my work as a marketing consultant for law firms, few questions are posed more frequently than this: How can we write more persuasive, effective content for our website? This is an age-old question in legal marketing, and the answer is even older. Persuasive content is that which follows a path laid thousands of years ago by Aristotle, the original master of persuasion. Aristotle’s insight, which has as much…
This article originally appeared on Attorney at Work. Spare Your Clients another Evening of Cheese Squares and Chardonnay Hosting networking, educational and social events is one of the best tactics to strengthen relationships with existing clients and establish connections with new ones. Events offer opportunities to engage on a deeper, more personal level, which is key to forming trust and laying the foundation for business development. Since these benefits are relatively obvious, almost every…
Most sophisticated professional services providers, such as lawyers, consultants, and accountants, aspire to be thought of as thought leaders. Thought leaders grab attention. They shape the narrative. Their ideas drive action. And their reputations lead to business opportunities. They’re trusted, admired, and sought after. The moniker of thought leadership cannot be bought, it must earned through hard work. The work primarily involved in becoming a thought leader is the sharing of compelling, interesting, and opinion-shifting…
This article by Jay Harrington first appeared on Law.com. It is part of his monthly Law.com expert opinion column on attorney professional development. While accepting the Nobel Prize for literature, Ernest Hemingway said, “Writing, at its best, is a lonely life.” But did Hemingway really do his best work in isolation? It depends on how you look at it. Surely he spent considerable time alone behind the typewriter. But away from his manuscripts, Hemingway intentionally…
This post originally appeared in JD Supra. In his classic book, Influence, psychologist Robert Cialdini identifies “authority” as one of the primary principles of persuasion. From a police officer in uniform, to a doctor in a lab coat, to a professor at a lectern, Cialdini explains that we tend to listen to and respect those who possess the titles and trappings of authority. But things have changed in the nearly 35 years since Influence…