Harrington Communications Blog

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If there’s one question I’ve received more than any other over the course of my career—from friends and family, from colleagues and clients—it’s this: Does [insert any marketing tactic here] really work? I suppose content marketing in the form of thought leadership should be no different. To be clear, what I, my partner, and our guests have been exploring on our aptly named podcast, The Thought Leadership Project, is a very specific strain of…
When I coach attorneys in an effort to help them get over the mental hurdles blocking them from building a book of business, I start by asking a seemingly simple question: What do you want? After an inevitable pause, I’ll typically receive answers such as “I want more clients,” “I want to make partner,” or “I want to become more productive.” Their answers suggest that they have some sort of vision in mind for the…
When I coach attorneys in an effort to help them get over the mental hurdles blocking them from building a book of business, I start by asking a seemingly simple question: What do you want? After an inevitable pause, I’ll typically receive answers such as “I want more clients,” “I want to make partner,” or “I want to become more productive.” Their answers suggest that they have some sort of vision in mind for the…
We’ve discussed in a previous post the Catch-22 that lawyers and other service professionals who bill their time face when it comes to developing their books of business: We have to bill our time to make money, but we have to spend our time doing non-billable work (prospecting) to build a practice. But what if that’s not the only conundrum standing in the way of an effective business development effort? What if, like many, you…
This post originally appeared on attorneyatwork.com For young lawyers in today’s market, to borrow a phrase from Dickens, it’s the best of times and the worst of times. It’s the “worst of times” because there’s no place to hide. Clients are less willing to pay for young associates’ time (which some clients view as “on the job training”). Law firms can’t afford to put up with mediocre performance. Firms expect more value from their associates…
By now, you’ve no doubt been exposed in some way to the massive explosion of the podcasting phenomenon. Perhaps you have a few favorites you listen to for fun, or for entertainment, or to learn something. Perhaps you’ve even found a few podcasts that you turn to for professional insights or expertise. You’re not alone. But what’s far less likely is that you’ve considered podcasting as a broadcasting platform for your own thought leadership, rather…
By now, you’ve no doubt been exposed in some way to the massive explosion of the podcasting phenomenon. Perhaps you have a few favorites you listen to for fun, or for entertainment, or to learn something. Perhaps you’ve even found a few podcasts that you turn to for professional insights or expertise. You’re not alone. But what’s far less likely is that you’ve considered podcasting as a broadcasting platform for your own thought leadership, rather…
By now, you’ve no doubt been exposed in some way to the massive explosion of the podcasting phenomenon. Perhaps you have a few favorites you listen to for fun, or for entertainment, or to learn something. Perhaps you’ve even found a few podcasts that you turn to for professional insights or expertise. You’re not alone. But what’s far less likely is that you’ve considered podcasting as a broadcasting platform for your own thought leadership, rather…
This post originally appeared on attorneyatwork.com A key reason companies such as Apple, Nike and Amazon are successful is that their brands are ubiquitous. They inject themselves into platforms, channels and conversations across the spectrum of communications. They use traditional advertising, social media promotion, content marketing, public relations and other marketing tactics to reach wide audiences. In other words, they use a multichannel approach to marketing. As a result, when consumers need a phone, athletic…
This post originally appeared on Law.com I started my legal career at one of the world’s largest law firms on September 17, 2001. I was supposed to be an M&A lawyer, but after the 9/11 terrorist attacks I was shifted to the corporate restructuring group. Planes were grounded and financial markets closed. The economy was still reeling from the dot-com crash. No one knew what was going to happen next, and companies were putting contingency…