Zaller Law Group

Zaller Law Group Blogs

Blog Authors

Latest from Zaller Law Group

In Rodriguez v. Taco Bell Corp., 896 F.3d 952 (9th Cir. 2018), an employee brought a putative class action alleging that Taco Bell’s discounted meal policy effectively denied employees the ability to take a duty free meal break.  At issue in this case was Taco Bell’s policy of offering a discounted meal from the restaurant during the employees’ meal breaks as long as the employees ate the meal on the company’s premises.  The ability to…
Rick Reyes, a law clerk at our firm, recently wrote an article published in the National Law Review: Transgender Individuals in the Workplace: An Overview of Employers’ Scope of Obligations in California. The article provides some great guidance for employers on this developing issue, such as new posters required by California law, training that addresses gender identity, gender expression and sexual orientation, facility, and grooming considerations.  The article can be read here.  Congratulations…
California employers have many different obligations to train employees on certain issues.  The primary training obligation that applies to nearly every employer (with 5 or more employees) is to provide sexual harassment prevention training.  However, as set forth below, different industries have different standards, and employers need to review the requirements that pertain to their industries and companies to ensure compliance. This article is the fifth article in my series of articles of employment audits…
On March 7, 2019, the United States Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued a proposed rulemaking to increase the salary level that employees must receive in order to qualify as an exempt employee.  The DOL sets standards under the Federal Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), but California employers are also required to comply with California’s wage and hour laws.  This Friday’s Five reviews five issues California employers need to understand about the DOL’s proposal and how…
California passed a wave of new laws in 2018 relating to the #metoo movement, many of which prohibit confidential settlement agreements or disclosure of allegations related to sexual harassment in the workplace.  This Friday’s Five post reviews five areas impacted by these new laws in 2019, which illustrate the need for employers to stay informed about the new requirements that apply to their company and industry: 1. SB 820 added Civil Procedure Code section 1001…
The process of separating an employee from a company must be clearly set out and planned in advance.  I recommend developing a separation checklist so that all of the company’s policies are followed, as well as any applicable laws that pertain to the employer and their industry.  This article is the fourth article in my series of articles of employment audits.  Prior articles covered the hiring process, records retention practices, and wage and
On February 4, 2019, a California Court of Appeal ruled that employees calling their employer to determine if they must come into work is considered reporting to work, and reporting time pay is owed to the employee if they are not required to work that day.  The case is Ward v. Tilly’s, Inc. from the Second District Court of Appeals.  Here are five key issues for employers to understand about the ruling: 1. Reporting time…
Expense reimbursement may seem like a small issue in comparison with the other areas of liability facing California employers, but the exposure for not appropriately reimbursing employees can be substantial. In Gattuso v. Harte-Hanks Shoppers, Inc., the California Supreme Court clarified the parameters of mileage reimbursement under California law, as well as the three different methods available for employers to reimburse employees for their mileage reimbursement.  This Friday’s Five post discusses five issues employers…
With the start of 2019, I’m writing a series of posts covering employment law areas that employers should audit on a routine basis.  The first two articles covered hiring practices and records retention practices.  This post covers five wage and hour considerations that every California employer should review on a routine basis: 1. Payroll Are the company’s workweeks and paydays established? Are paydays within the applicable time limits after the pay period as required…
The beginning of 2019 brought substantial employment case settlements and verdicts.  This Friday’s Five reviews the settlements and verdicts that should catch the attention of all employers, as well as a review of the U.S. Supreme Court’s new ruling on arbitration agreements for transportation workers: 1. Restaurant settles claim with Labor Commissioner for $4 million covering approximately 300 employees. The restaurant chain in the San Francisco bay area, Rangoon Ruby, settled a Labor Commissioner claim