Amazing Firms, Amazing Practices

Blog Authors

Latest from Amazing Firms, Amazing Practices

When lawyers first started creating bios of themselves for use in firm promotion, clients generally used them to choose a firm, or to check out who they’d be working with after the firm had made the assignment. However, Michael Rynowecer at The Mad Clientist warns that these days, clients are using attorney bios to assess prospective candidates for legal work they need to have done – and then advising the law firm of the name…
In an article published recently on The American Lawyer, writer Dan Packel reports that this year, “For the first time, PwC, Deloitte, EY and KPMG seized four of the top five spots on [the U.K. consultancy Acritas’s] list of global alternative brands, in a survey of general counsel at heavyweight international businesses.” Packel points out that the attainment of this milestone follows several years of “concerted push” on the part of the accounting firms,…
Last month, Internet Brands – a vertical marketing conglomerate in which marketing for the legal industry forms a major pillar – announced that it was changing the name of its law-services website from “The Martindale Legal Network” to “Martindale-Avvo.”  The name change followed the acquisition by Internet Brands of Avvo.com. To see these two names – Martindale and Avvo – joined together would have been unimaginable even a few short years ago. For…
In a recent article for Artificial Lawyer, Richard Jeens and Natalie Osafo – partner and associate respectively at Slaughter and May –  point out that regulators and corporates are increasingly using artificial intelligence (AI) to carry out investigations. They offer the example of a complex matter conducted by the Serious Offences Office in the UK (investigations into Rolls Royce, advised by Slaughter and May), in which the SOO used AI to reduce the amount of time…
Remember when we all learned that humans use only about ten percent of their brains? Well, apparently that is an urban myth – science has shown that we use all parts of our brains every day. However, it turns out that humans are responsible for the current stunning underuse of advances in artificial intelligence that could be easing their mental workloads. Even at DLA Piper, one of the major users of legal technology (such as the contract and…
Lest any of us get too comfortable in our swivel chairs, a new report from Michael B. Rynowecer, president of the BTI Consulting Group, indicates that in 2018 – despite spending more on outside legal counsel than ever before – clients are using fewer outside firms than ever. In a September issue of The Mad Clientist –the blog of BTI — Rynowecer reported that his company’s survey of more than 350 law-firm clients showed that “22%…
U.S. law-firm mergers to the end of the third quarter of 2018 reached levels unseen in the first three quarters of any year for more than a decade, according to an article published last week at law.com. The number of mergers recorded by Fairfax Associates between January 1 and the end of September of this year stood at 56, up six from the same period in 2017. Twenty of them were completed in the third…
For those who may be apprehensive about so much as clicking on a post relating to artificial intelligence (AI) as it applies to legal practice, I highly recommend a recent article in The Artificial Lawyer by Product Manager David Kleiman of Bloomberg Law. Kleiman points out that anyone who has ever used Google has already entered the world of AI, and that customized AI is the next logical step in the evolution of legal practice. “AI can…
A month ago we reported on the expansion of EY into the legal field through its acquisition of the U.K.’s Riverview Law. Now we learn that PwC U.K. has joined forces with immigration law specialists Fragomen of New York City – giving PwC “a major foothold in the U.S. market,” according to a report in The American Lawyer. Fragomen has offices in 16 major U.S. cities and 25 offices outside the U.S., while PwC offers…
In an interesting fusion of technology and food, a company called eatNgage is offering users the opportunity to participate in virtual lunch meetings with groups of staff, clients, colleagues or others. The rationale? People are more likely to look forward to, and show up for, a meeting that involves a meal than one that takes place during traditional working hours. eatNgage reports that to date, those who have used their service have an average of…