Ten Things You Need To Know As In-House Counsel

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For the last several years, non-compete agreements have been under attack in the U.S. by regulators, legislators, and even the courts.  For example, in October 2018, Massachusetts joined states like California, North Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Utah, and others by enacting a law regulating non-compete agreements, including providing for “garden leave” and making them inapplicable to “non-exempt” employees.  Courts do not favor non-competes and will often look for any reason to limit them or…
Hello everyone!  Best wishes for the New Year to all of you.  I am excited about 2019, especially when it comes to this blog – and I’ll have some news to share about me next month.  I have a lot of (hopefully) interesting topics on my list for the coming 12 months.  And I am working on volume two of “Ten Things You Need to Know as In-House Counsel – Practical Advice and Successful
[Don’t forget to vote for “Ten Things” as your favorite legal blog.  To vote, simply click here.] Well, it’s near the end of 2018 and time for my annual list of the best legal blogs for in-house counsel.  This is my fourth list, a tradition starting in 2015.  In case you’re curious, here are my past lists for 2015, 2016, and 2017.  I still highly recommend the legal blogs listed in…
[Vote for “Ten Things” as your favorite legal blog.  To vote, click here.] I’ve been around a while and I know from first-hand experience that there is little more disconcerting to an in-house lawyer than being contacted by the government when it starts investigating your company.  It makes your stomach feel like The Hulk has reached down your throat to give your intestines a good squeeze.  What happens in such an investigation, in large…
After “will I go to jail for that?” the most common question asked of in-house counsel typically involves commercial contracts and whether “it’s okay for us to sign this?”  There are multiple parts to this seemingly simple ask, but the core of the question has to do with risk.  More specifically, if we sign this contract are we taking on an unacceptable level of risk?  Risk too is subject to multiple meanings.  Are we talking…