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Workplace Initiatives and Strategies for Employers

Latest from WISE

Labor Law Update: Contractors Lawfully Prohibited From Leafleting on Third Party Premises On August 23, 2019, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) determined that property owners may prohibit non-employees from accessing their premises to engage in conduct that could be protected by federal labor law. This ruling is consistent with other decisions recently issued by the NLRB, which have overturned longstanding precedent in favor of more employer-friendly standards. In February 2017, the Tobin Center for…
You’re Invited: Federal and State Employment Law Updates – Hosted by Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr’s Labor & Employment Practice Please join us as the Firm’s Labor & Employment Practice hosts our Executive Series, “Federal and State Employment Law Update” on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019. This program will be live streamed from our Philadelphia office to each of the following Firm offices. (When registering, please be sure to indicate your choice of location). Baltimore –…
On August 8, 2019, the Department of Labor (DOL) released an Opinion Letter clarifying that parents of students with special education needs may take leave under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) to attend a meeting related to addressing those needs. Importantly, the DOL stated that its analysis and conclusion apply to “any meetings held pursuant to the [Individuals with Disabilities Education Act], and any applicable state or local law, regardless of the term used…
New York State Overhauls Harassment Laws Making it Easier to Bring Employers to Court Earlier this summer the New York State Senate and Assembly passed a bill aimed to amend the New York State Human Rights Law (NYSHRL) and the N.Y. Civil Practice Law and Rules (CPLR) to combat harassment and provide substantial new protections for workers. Governor Cuomo signed the bill into law on August 12, 2019. The following provisions highlight the major changes…
New York Employers – New Pay Equity Laws and Hair Bias Ban May Require You to Update Your Policies The New York State Legislature and Governor Cuomo have been busy in 2019 enacting laws that will have a lasting impact on employers and workers in the Empire State for years to come. Among these are bans on inquiring about salary history, and discriminating against individuals on the basis of their natural hairstyle. Employers should understand…
On August 6, 2019, Acting Governor Sheila Oliver signed a bill (S-1790) imposing tougher penalties for “wage theft.” The law significantly increases penalties for employers, including potential imprisonment for employers who run afoul of its provisions, and provides added protections for employee retaliation claims. The law imposes a new joint and several liability provision for client-employers and labor contractors, specifically, it declares any waiver of joint and several liability as “void and unenforceable.”  Employers need…
On August 8, 2019, the Minneapolis City Council unanimously passed the Wage Theft Prevention Ordinance, which reinforces safeguards for the city’s labor force. The Ordinance, which goes into effect on January 1, 2020, prohibits employers from shortchanging paychecks, attempting to make it appear that wages paid were greater than the amount actually issued, or paying wages on days other days other than regularly established paydays. It also prohibits employers from demanding that employees give any…
Chicago recently joined a growing trend when City Council approved one of the broadest predictive scheduling laws in the country. The Chicago Fair Workweek Ordinance, which was passed on July 24, 2019, will go into effect beginning on July 1, 2020, and has the potential to cause headaches for companies that have workers in Chicago. The Ordinance requires employers in certain industries to provide a good faith estimate to new employees of their projected days…
A combination of New Jersey court decisions and legislative actions have expanded and clarified New Jersey employer obligations for employees who are registered qualifying cannabis patients. Both the New Jersey Federal District Court and the New Jersey State Appellate Division have weighed in, with the New Jersey Supreme Court recently announcing that it will review the Appellate Division ruling. Further, on July 2nd, New Jersey signed into law an amendment to the New Jersey Compassionate…
On July 25, 2019, New Jersey Lt. Governor Sheila Oliver signed a bill prohibiting employers from asking job applicants their previous salary history. The new law aligns with Governor Murphy’s first official act as governor in 2018, when he signed Executive Order No. 1 prohibiting state agencies and offices from asking job candidates their previous salaries. The new law applies to all employers in New Jersey. The new law takes effect in six months. The…